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Southwest Virginia Campbells

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 Five Generation Genealogical Report -- "Black David" Branch of Campbell Family

By Phil Norfleet

 

Generation No. 1

1. Alexander1 Campbell was born Abt. 1685 in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland, and died 1758 in Augusta County VA. He married Name Unknown Abt. 1707 in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland. She died Aft. 1758 in Augusta County VA.

Notes for Alexander Campbell:

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL - FATHER OF BLACK DAVID

I believe this Alexander Campbell is the father of Black David. This conclusion is supported by the will and land records of both Orange and Augusta Counties. The following land transactions involving Alexander Campbell, Sr. and his sons are of particular interest:

1. 02 November 1744: Alexander Campbell acquires 559 acres of land in Beverley Manor directly from William Beverley.

2. 28 May 1751: Alexander Campbell, "wheelwright," conveys 80 acres of land in Beverley Manor to David Campbell. The land was near a corner tract surveyed for William Campbell and near the corner of David Campbell's "other survey." Presumably this David Campbell was his son who we now call "Black David." The "other survey" was presumably the 106 acre tract which David Campbell purchased from William Beverley in February 1749/1750.

3. 28 May 1751: Alexander sells 166 acres of land to a certain Michael Raily.

4. 20 May 1752: Alexander Campbell, "farmer," conveys 200 acres of land to William Campbell at "his father's and William Ledgerwood's corner;" also at "his father's and his brother David's corner" and "his brother Robert's corner."

5. 18 August 1772: William Campbell conveys two tracts of land totaling 186 acres in Beverley Manor to David Steel. The tracts are described as being:

" the Courses of the hundred and six acres which joins lines with the eighty acres that David Campbell got from his father. "

This William Campbell is almost certainly Captain William Campbell (1748-1800), son of Black David. Since Black David died intestate, under the law of primogeniture in effect at that time, both the 106-acre and 80-acre tracts would have automatically gone to Captain William Campbell as the eldest son.

Alexander Campbell died in the year 1758. His will, dated 02 March 1753, was probated in the Augusta County Court on 16 August 1758. In his will, Alexander Campbell bequeaths the plantation where he now lives to his youngest son, Alexander and maintenance for his wife (unnamed); other children mentioned are his daughters Florence, Mary and Jane. As executors, he names his son William Campbell and William Ledgerwood. The will was witnessed by Patrick Cunningham, Robert Campbell and Walter Davis.

The Augusta County, Virginia land record, cited above at number 4, establishes that, besides Alexander and William who are named in his will, Alexander Campbell, Sr. had at least two other sons - Robert and David. The "brother David" so cited must be "Black David." Further support for this conclusion comes from the later Augusta County land transaction cited above at number 5, where the two tracts of land acquired by David Campbell are now being sold by William Campbell (Black David's son). It should be noted that, according to Margaret Campbell Pilcher, Black David Campbell died in November 1753, several years before his father.

Children of Alexander Campbell and Name Unknown are:

+ 2 i. Alexander2 Campbell, born in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland; died Abt. 1787 in Fayette County KY.

3 ii. Elizabeth Campbell.

4 iii. Florence Campbell, born in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland.

5 iv. Jane Campbell, born in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland; died 1800. She married _____ Allison.

+ 6 v. Mary Campbell, born in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland.

7 vi. William Campbell, born Bef. 1710 in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland; died Bef. 1770 in Augusta County VA. He married Mary Byers (?).

+ 8 vii. David (Black David) Campbell, born Abt. 1710 in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland; died November 1753 in Augusta County VA.

+ 9 viii. Robert Campbell, born Abt. 1718 in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland; died Bef. November 1797 in Washington County NC.

 

Generation No. 2

2. Alexander2 Campbell (Alexander1) was born in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland, and died Abt. 1787 in Fayette County KY. He married Jean _____.

Children of Alexander Campbell and Jean _____ are:

10 i. Florence3 Campbell.

11 ii. James Campbell.

12 iii. Jane Campbell.

13 iv. Molly Campbell.

14 v. Sally Campbell.

15 vi. Thomas Campbell.

16 vii. William Campbell.

+ 17 viii. Ann Campbell, born 1767 in VA Colony; died 23 September 1820 in Muhlenberg County KY.

+ 18 ix. Alexander Campbell, died 1828 in Muhlenberg County KY.

19 x. John Campbell.

 

6. Mary2 Campbell (Alexander1) was born in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland. She married Major John Steele.

Child of Mary Campbell and Major Steele is:

20 i. Colonel John3 Steele.

 

8. David (Black David)2 Campbell (Alexander1) was born Abt. 1710 in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland, and died November 1753 in Augusta County VA. He married Jane Conyngham Abt. 1747 in Augusta County VA, daughter of Walter Conyngham and Martha Conyngham. She was born Abt. 1728 in Pennsylvania Colony, and died August 1759 in Augusta County VA.

Notes for David (Black David) Campbell:

David Campbell (1710-1753), better known as "Black David," is a familiar name to those people researching the Campbells of Southwest Virginia. Many notable pioneers and military/political figures are descendants of Black David. For example, both of his sons, Captain William (1748-1800) and Colonel David (1753-1832) were Revolutionary War veterans. Colonel David was the founder of Campbell's Station, near Knoxville TN. A daughter of Black David, Martha Campbell (1750-1825), married Major John Morrison and was the first white woman to permanently reside at what is now the city of Lexington KY. William Bowen Campbell (1807-1867), the last Whig governor of TN was a great-grandson of Black David. Also, Alexander W. Campbell (1828-1893), a great- great-grandson of Black David, was a Brigadier General in the Confederate Army serving under General Nathan Bedford Forrest during the last months of the Civil War.

 

As a direct descendant of both Black David and his brother Robert Campbell, I have often wondered if the unsubstantiated information provided by Margaret Campbell Pilcher at pages 130-134 of her book "Historical Sketches of the Campbell, Pilcher and Kindred Families" (published 1911), concerning Black David, was supported by the official records of Augusta County, Virginia. Several years ago I commenced a study of these records and those of early Orange County (parent county of Augusta). The following paragraphs summarize some of the results of my research.

PARENTS OF BLACK DAVID

Published Family Traditions:

Margaret Campbell Pilcher (1843-1921) was a great-great granddaughter of both White David and Black David. Indeed, she is the person most responsible for the use of the terms "White David" and "Black David" in describing these two men who married half-sisters. In her book on Campbell family history, she tells us the following regarding the ancestors of "Black David" Campbell:

"Alexander Campbell lived at Inveraray, Argyleshire, Scotland. His son, William Campbell, married Mary Byers. They emigrated from Scotland to the north of Ireland, near Londonderry. In Donegal Township, Ulster District. There they lived for some years, then moved, with their seven children, to America, the exact date of removal cannot be obtained. The father was an upright, honorable gentleman in every respect; the mother a woman of remarkable intelligence and possessed many womanly virtues. Their children were: David, Elizabeth, Martha, Alexander, Robert, William, Jane and Mary Campbell - eight in all."

William Campbell (1793-1885) was a great-grandson of Black David, whose mother (Margaret Campbell) was a daughter of Robert Campbell (a brother of Black David) and Margaret Kirkpatrick. In a letter written in 1874, he tells us the following regarding the origins of his family:

"I give this history of the Campbell family from the information of father and mother to my first recollection. I will begin at mother's side, as she was one generation older than father's.

"Mother's grandfather came to America in 1704 from Scotland. I think there were three of them. I know but little of any of them. Only a few of them have I heard spoken of. John B. Campbell, from one branch of the family, formerly lived in Hopkinsville, Kentucky was a colonel and was killed in the War of 1812. He had two brothers who were in Kentucky a while, David and Charles."

Based on the above statements, one could conclude that the first Campbell immigrants were William Campbell (son of Alexander) and Mary Byers, who arrived in America in the year 1704. Their children would have included Black David and his brothers Alexander and Robert. However, as will hopefully be shown in the following paragraphs, the official records strongly imply that the above accounts contain several errors.

The Official Record:

Based upon my review of the court and land records of Orange County and Augusta County, Virginia, I have concluded that the father of Black David Campbell was Alexander Campbell not William Campbell. This Alexander Campbell settled within the confines of the Beverley Manor Grant (near the modern-day city of Staunton) in about the year 1744. I have not yet been able to determine the name of Alexander's wife; however, she and her husband had at least seven children including four sons (Black David, Alexander, Robert and William) and three daughters (Florence, Mary and Jane). This conclusion directly contradicts Mrs. Pilcher's claim that Black David's parents were William Campbell and Mary Byers, and that Alexander Campbell was Black David's grandfather.

BEVERLEY MANOR LAND GRANT

By patent, dated 06 September 1736, Lt. Governor William Gooch of Virginia issued a grant of 118,491 acres of land which lay "beyond the Great Mountains on the River Sherando [Shenandoah] called the Manor of Beverley" to William Beverley (1696-1756) of Essex County, Virginia and his partners in the venture: John Randolph, Richard Randolph and John Robinson. On the day after the grant was made, the partners conveyed their interest to Beverley who, in turn, began to sell to settlers. Most of these settlers were Scotch-Irish immigrants who had come down the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania to what was then Orange County, Virginia but soon would become part of the newly formed county of Augusta. The families of both White David and Black David Campbell were among the early settlers in the Manor.

LAND PLAT OF BEVERLEY MANOR

In his well researched book The Tinkling Spring, Headwater of Freedom, Howard McKnight Wilson, Th.D. includes a magnificent map of all the early land plats of Beverley Manor. The early Campbell land purchases are all clearly delineated and are concentrated at the southwestern end of the manor. The map also depicts many nearby land plats belonging to families known to have been allied by marriage to both the White David and Black David Campbells, such as the Cunninghams, Allisons, Lockharts, Kirkpatricks and Hamiltons.

 

"BLACK DAVID" CAMPBELL (1710-1753)

Family Traditions:

Margaret Campbell Pilcher has this to say about "Black David" Campbell:

"David Campbell (called 'Black David,' because of his dark hair, eyes and complexion, and to, distinguish him from his cousin, 'White David" Campbell, who was very fair, with yellow hair and blue eyes) was born about 1710. He married Jane Conyngham, a half-sister of Mary Hamilton ('White David' Campbell's wife). David Campbell and his wife, Jane Conyngham, came from Ireland with their parents. They settled in the Colony of Virginia, it is thought, first in Culpepper County. Later, they removed to Augusta County, Virginia, which was at that time a frontier settlement. To this section of Virginia had emigrated a large number of Scotch-Irish, a brave, independent, liberty-loving race of people, who were faithful friends and the best of citizens. They gave to our country many of her greatest men.

"David Campbell, born in 1710, died in November, 1753, and Jane Conyngham, his wife, died in August, 1759. They had four children, namely: William, Mary, Martha and David Campbell."

The Official Record:

I have no fundamental disagreement with Mrs. Pilcher's statements, cited above, concerning either Black David or White David Campbell. Based on Orange County and Augusta County land records, Black David migrated, with his father, Alexander Campbell, his three brothers (William, Robert and Alexander) and at least three sisters (Florence, Mary and Jane) to Augusta County (Beverley Manor) in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, in about the year 1744.

Shortly after arriving in Beverley Manor, about the year 1747, Black David married Jane Conyngham (Cunningham), the daughter of Walter and Martha Conyngham. At the time of the marriage, Black David, if he was born in 1710, would have been about 37 years old, rather old for a first marriage. However, I have no hard evidence with which to deny Mrs. Pilcher's assertion that Black David was born in 1710. Black David Campbell and Jane Conyngham had four known children: William (b. 1748), David (b. August 1753), Mary (b. c. 1751) and Martha (b. 1750). Black David was short lived, dying intestate in Augusta County, Virginia in November 1753. Jane Campbell, Black David's wife, died in Augusta County, Virginia in August 1759.

 

 

 

 

Notes for Jane Conyngham:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

JANE CUNNINGHAM - WIFE OF BLACK DAVID CAMPBELL

The wife of Black David was Jane Cunningham, the daughter of Walter and Martha Cunningham and the half sister of Mary Hamilton, the wife of White David. Margaret Campbell Pilcher has this to say regarding the Hamiltons and the Cunninghams (Conynghams):

"James Hamilton married Janet Campbell, at Inveraray, Scotland. They had two children: Arthur and James. Arthur Hamilton married Martha Conyngham, daughter of Patrick Conyngham and Euphemia Vesse, his wife. He died near Londonderry, Ireland, leaving his widow with two small children: Mary and Arthur. She married a cousin, Walter Conyngham, with whom she and her two children came to America. At this time, Mary Hamilton, her daughter, was ten years of age, in 1726. She had several children by her second husband, Walter Conyngham, but of these we have no record, except of Jane Conyngham, the eldest, who married another David Campbell, called "Black David," on account of his dark complexion, to distinguish him from his relative of the same name, "White" David Campbell, who married Mary Hamilton, the half-sister of Jane Conyngham. Thus it will be noted that the half-sisters, Mary Hamilton and Jane Conyngham, married each a David Campbell, distant cousins, who were of the same clan in Scotland.

" Patrick Conyngham was a Colonel commanding a regiment at the battle of Boyne, under King William of Orange. He married Euphemia Vesse. They had two children that we have on record: James and Martha Conyngham. Martha Conyngham married first Arthur Hamilton, and after his death she married a cousin, Walter Conyngham, with whom, and her two children, Mary and Arthur Hamilton, she emigrated to America in 1726."

I have found nothing in the official records that would contradict the above statements of Mrs. Pilcher.

Children of David Campbell and Jane Conyngham are:

+ 21 i. William (Captain William)3 Campbell, born 1748 in Augusta County VA; died 1800 in Fayette County KY.

+ 22 ii. Martha (Molly) Campbell, born 1750 in Augusta County VA; died 02 July 1825 in Fayette County KY.

23 iii. Mary Campbell, born Abt. 1751. She married William (Captain William) Allison.

Notes for Mary Campbell:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

MARY CAMPBELL (BORN C. 1751)

According to Margaret Campbell Pilcher, Mary Campbell married a certain Captain William Ellison (Allison?). I have found little mention in the Virginia/Kentucky records of anyone named William Ellison. However, the Scotch-Irish used the names "Ellison" and "Allison" almost interchangeably. Therefore, William may have been the son of John Allison, who was part of the Allison/Campbell migration group, of which Mary's brother, Captain William Campbell (1748-1800), was a member. Circa 1784, William and Mary Ellison (Allison) may have migrated to Kentucky with the Campbells. On 09 November 1792, Governor Shelby commissioned a certain William Allison as a Captain in the 9th Regiment of the Fayette County militia. William's brother-in-law, Major John Morrison, was also in the 9th Regiment.

 

+ 24 iv. David (Colonel David) Campbell, born August 1753 in Augusta County VA; died 24 November 1832 in Wilson County TN.

 

9. Robert2 Campbell (Alexander1) was born Abt. 1718 in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland, and died Bef. November 1797 in Washington County NC. He married (1) Ann (Nancy) _____ Abt. 1755 in Augusta County VA. She died Abt. 1764 in Augusta County VA. He married (2) Margaret Killpatrick Abt. 1765 in Augusta County VA. She died Aft. 1774.

Children of Robert Campbell and Ann _____ are:

+ 25 i. James (Big Jimmie)3 Campbell, born 15 February 1759 in Augusta County VA; died 08 April 1844 in Knox County TN.

+ 26 ii. Alexander (Captain Alexander) Campbell, born Abt. 1760 in Augusta County VA; died 07 September 1816 in Knox County TN.

+ 27 iii. David (Elder David) Campbell, born August 1762 in Augusta County VA; died 1813 in Knox County TN.

Children of Robert Campbell and Margaret Killpatrick are:

+ 28 i. John R.3 Campbell, born Abt. 1772 in Augusta County VA; died 07 October 1847 in Mount Sterling KY.

+ 29 ii. Margaret Campbell, born 28 November 1774; died 04 October 1853 in Calloway County MO.

+ 30 iii. William (Major William) Campbell, born 17 October 1776 in Montgomery County VA; died 11 January 1842 in Madison County TN.

 

Generation No. 3

17. Ann3 Campbell (Alexander2, Alexander1) was born 1767 in VA Colony, and died 23 September 1820 in Muhlenberg County KY. She married William McNary Abt. 1790 in Fayette County KY. He was born Abt. 1757 in Scotland, and died 19 August 1813 in Muhlenberg County KY.

Children of Ann Campbell and William McNary are:

+ 31 i. Hugh W.4 McNary, born 26 November 1790 in Fayette County KY; died 07 October 1872 in Muhlenberg County KY.

32 ii. Thomas L. McNary, born Abt. 1795.

+ 33 iii. William C. McNary, born 12 September 1801; died 19 September 1875 in Muhlenberg County KY.

34 iv. Elizabeth McNary, born 1797; died 06 July 1839 in Muhlenberg County KY.

+ 35 v. Sarah McNary, born 05 September 1799; died 16 November 1821 in Muhlenberg County KY.

 

18. Alexander3 Campbell (Alexander2, Alexander1) died 1828 in Muhlenberg County KY. He married Mary _____. She died Aft. 1828 in Muhlenberg County KY.

Children of Alexander Campbell and Mary _____ are:

36 i. Thomas4 Campbell.

37 ii. James Campbell.

38 iii. Semin Campbell.

 

21. William (Captain William)3 Campbell (David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 1748 in Augusta County VA, and died 1800 in Fayette County KY. He married Mary Elizabeth Ellison Abt. 1770 in VA Colony. She was born 1755 in VA Colony, and died 1825 in Gallatin County IL.

Notes for William (Captain William) Campbell:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM CAMPBELL (1748-1800)

Family Traditions:

William Campbell of Santa Clara has this to say about his grandfather, Captain William Campbell:

" Grandfather had one brother and two sisters. His brother, David went to North Carolina and helped to build Campbell's Station. Grandfather's sisters, Molly Morrison and Molly Allison and Uncle Morrison came to Kentucky before grandfather and assisted in building the fort where Lexington now stands in Kentucky. I do not recollect the date of building the fort, although I have heard Uncle Morrison often speak of it in connection with the early settlements in Kentucky. Of grandfather's family, father was the oldest. He was born in October 1772. Mother was born October 1774. The family names were David; John, who was drowned in the Kentucky River, was two years younger than father; Jane; Ann; Charles; William; Betsey; Martha; Polly; and Sally."

Margaret Campbell Pilcher tells us the following about Captain William Campbell:

"William Campbell married Mary Ellison. He was First Lieutenant in the First Virginia Regiment on Continental establishment, June 21, 1778; Captain, January 16, 1779, and served to January 1782. See Heitman's Register of Officers of the Continental Army, page 115. He was Captain in the French and Indian Wars in the Virginia Colonial Army, before the Revolution of 1776; was General of the Militia, after the close of the war; was always called General Campbell. He went to Kentucky to live. He had eight children, namely: Eliza, Jane, David, Martha, Anne, Mary, Sally, and William Campbell. Eliza married Mr. Hayes. Jane married Mr. Marten. Martha married Mr. Siddle. Mary married Mr. Guard. Sally married Timothy Guard. William's wife's name not known. David Campbell married Mary Campbell. "

My Analysis of the Family Traditions:

While I have no quarrel with the few remarks that William Campbell of Santa Clara makes about his grandfather, Captain William Campbell, I do have serious differences with the statements of Mrs. Pilcher concerning this same man. The William Campbell she cites from Heitman's Register is another William Campbell entirely. I will separately address the Heitman issue under the topic of Captain William Campbell's military service. There is a slight conflict between the child lists of Mrs. Pilcher and William Campbell of Santa Clara. William identifies two additional children. Mrs. Pilcher does not mention the two sons, John and Charles. I believe William Campbell's list to be correct. There is considerable documentary evidence confirming the existence of Charles. I have never found any records regarding the John Campbell who died in the Kentucky River; however, I have no reason to doubt the accuracy of William's remarks concerning this man. My other findings concerning Captain William Campbell are presented in the paragraphs that follow.

Captain William Campbell, the eldest son of "Black David" Campbell, was born in Augusta County (at Beverley Manor), Virginia in the year 1748. William's father, Black David, died intestate in 1753, when William was only five years old. Primogeniture was the prevailing legal principle of Virginia Colony at that time, hence William became the sole heir to his father's real property. The land records of Augusta County indicate that this inheritance consisted of only two small tracts of land, one of 106 acres and another of 80 acres, both located in Beverley Manor.

William was apparently brought up by his uncles, William, Robert and Alexander Campbell. His uncle, William Campbell, was probably the eldest and may have died in Beverley Manor. However, there is documentary evidence supporting the migration of Captain William Campbell (and his uncles Robert and Alexander) out of Beverley Manor: 1st) to the South Fork of the Holston River in Botetourt County, Virginia in about the year 1770; 2nd) to the Limestone Creek area of Washington County, North Carolina (later part of Tennessee) in about the year 1779; and 3rd) to Fayette County, Virginia (later part of Kentucky) in about the year 1784. The records indicate that he migrated with his uncles Robert and Alexander, as well as John and Charles Allison (who may also be his uncles by marriage). Further support for the migration to Kentucky is provided by Captain William Campbell's grandson, William Campbell (1793-1885) of Santa Clara, who tells us the following concerning his great-uncles and grandfather:

"Uncle Alexander Campbell's family, mother's uncle, I know all about. He came to Kentucky in 1784 with his family; with mother's father (his brother); and with grandfather's family."

Emigration to Botetourt County, Virginia:

Botetourt County was formed out of the southeastern portion of Augusta County in November 1769. Shortly after the formation of this new county, Captain William Campbell and his uncles apparently emigrated from Beverley Manor and settled in that area of Botetourt lying on the South Fork of the Holston River.

A Botetourt County "List of Tithables" (taken by Captain Walter Crockett) for the year 1771 includes the following five names:

John Ellison & his son William

Charles Ellison & one slave

William Campbell

Alexander Campbell

Robert Campbell

I am quite sure that these same people are Captain William Campbell and his uncles. The tax list is not alphabetical and probably represents the order in which the names were first written. The first four entries are all listed next to one another, implying that these people were entered at the same time (as a group?) and were perhaps close neighbors. Robert Campbell is entered on a different page, hence he may have lived at some distance from the others. We known that these same five people owned land in this area that they sold in 1779, prior to their leaving for Tennessee.

Botetourt County Deed Information: Published deed records of Botetourt County contain the following genealogically interesting transactions re the Campbells and Allisons:

07 Aug 1771: John Campbell conveys 300 acres of land, called "Royal Oak," located on the Holston River, to David Campbell. [Since Royal Oak was the home of "White David" Campbell, he must be the person cited in the indenture!]

13 Aug 1771: John Allison and "Jenet", his wife convey 110 acres of land, located on the Fork of the James River, to Charles Allison.

13 August 1771: Charles Allison and "Jean" Allison convey 305 acres of land, located on the Mill Creek Branch of the James River, to John Greenlee.

Both "Jenet" and "Jean" can be nicknames for "Jane." One of these ladies is undoubtedly the same Jane Campbell, sister of Black David, who, according to Margaret Campbell Pilcher, married a "Mr. Allison."

Fincastle County Deed Information: In 1772, Fincastle County was formed from Botetourt and the land settled by the Campbells fell within this new county. The records of Fincastle County indicate that Charles Allison had a mill on South Fork of the Holston. Published deed records of Fincastle County contain the following transaction concerning the Allisons and Campbells:

02 Mar 1773: Walter Crockett, Margaret his wife, and William Sayers convey to John Allison, Charles Allison, Robert Campbell, Alexander Campbell and William Campbell, 450 acres of land located on the Headwaters of the South Fork of the Holston.

Please note that Walter Crockett was the local captain of the militia; it was he who prepared the "List of Tithables" for Botetourt County, in 1771, cited above. The Campbells and Allisons must have been in the area for at least two years prior to this 1773 purchase. Incidentally, Captain Walter Crockett's company of militia was one of the militia units called out by the orders of Colonel William Preston to join the expedition of Colonel Andrew Lewis to the Ohio River during the so-called Lord Dunmore's War. William Campbell (1748-1800) was a private in Crockett's company and it was in this way that William took part in the Battle of Point Pleasant (10 October 1774) against the Shawnee forces led by Chief Cornstalk.

In 1776, Montgomery County was formed out of Fincastle and the Campbell/Allison lands became a part of this county.

Emigration to Tennessee:

As mentioned above, in the late 1770's, Captain William Campbell and his uncles were living in Virginia, on the Holston River in the newly formed county of Montgomery. There are several deeds, all dated 18 August 1779, on file in Montgomery County, Virginia where William Campbell, Robert Campbell, Alexander Campbell, John Allison and Charles Allison convey their jointly owned land on the South Fork of the Holston River to several individuals.

I have concluded that, after the sales, the Campbells (including Robert) along with John and Charles Allison, emigrated as a group to East Tennessee. Land grants/purchases in the Limestone Creek area of Washington County, North Carolina (later part of Tennessee) exist for each of these five men. As previously mentioned, I suspect that one or both of the Allisons were married to Campbell ladies, probably sisters of Black David!

The prime area of Campbell/Allison settlement was near the place where the Big Limestone flows into the Nolichucky River. This region was also the heartland of the independent "State of Franklin" movement. John Sevier, known as "Nolichucky Jack" to his followers, was the prime leader in this movement; his plantation was located only a few miles from the Campbell land holdings.

In spite of the fact that the earliest grants are dated 1782, I am quite sure that the Campbells and Allisons had actually settled much of this land several years earlier - probably in 1779-1780. A complicating factor regarding land ownership was that, in the mid-1780's, the Big Limestone Creek area was a part of the independent "State of Franklin." This "State" was never officially recognized by either North Carolina or the Federal Government, but it was the de facto governing body ("Nolichucky Jack" Sevier was the elected governor) during the period 1784-1787. During this whole period, the issuance of land titles in eastern Tennessee was in an almost total state of anarchy. One result was that there were no land grants issued by North Carolina in Washington County between 1783 and 1787. Further proof that the Allisons and Campbells were already settled in the area before 1782 is shown in the tax lists of Washington County, North Carolina for the year 1781.

Emigration to Kentucky:

After the conclusion of the Revolutionary War, in the 1784-1787 timeframe, Captain William Campbell and his uncles, Robert and Alexander, migrated to Fayette County (then a part of the State of Virginia). William Campbell (1793-1885) of Santa Clara, California states that the migration occurred in 1784. If so, the decision to emigrate was probably due to the politically unstable condition of the area due to the unilateral formation of the independent State of Franklin during that same year. William's younger brother, David (1753-1832) stayed in the region, probably because of his relationship to his two brothers-in-law, Colonel Arthur Campbell and Judge David Campbell, both of whom were leaders in the Franklin movement.

The earliest Fayette County, Kentucky tax records, which have survived, commence with the year 1787; a review of these records indicates that Captain William Campbell, Robert Campbell and Alexander Campbell were all residents of Fayette County at that time

In Kentucky, Captain Campbell warranted and settled on land near the modern-day city of Lexington. Unfortunately, like Daniel Boone and many other early settlers in that area of Kentucky, he failed to perfect his title and was forced to abandon his land claim. In 1793 he acquired clear title to 137 acres of land on the waters of North Elkhorn Creek from the well-known Baptist minister, the Reverend Lewis Craig. The land was adjacent to a 93-acre tract which a certain Alexander Campbell, had also purchased from Reverend Craig, by an indenture, dated 14 May 1793. This Alexander was probably the cousin of William and the son of William's uncle, Alexander Campbell, who probably had died in Fayette County in about the year 1787. The land acquired by William and Alexander was part of a 400 acre tract, which Lewis Craig had surveyed on 27 January 1783. The remainder of the 400 acre tract (170 acres) was sold to a man named Pugh Price, at about the same time as the Campbell purchases.

In his later years, Captain Campbell operated a cloth fullering business in Lexington near the cloth mill owned by his brother-in-law, Major John Morrison (husband of his sister Martha (Molly) Campbell). Based on analysis of the Fayette County tax records, Captain Campbell died in about the year 1800.

According to information provided by his grandson, John Lloyd Campbell (1816-1875) who was the son of Charles Campbell (1782-1821) and his wife Nancy Oates (1791-1849), Captain William Campbell was buried in the old Baptist graveyard in Lexington.

Military Service of Captain William Campbell:

In 1774, while living in Botetourt County, Virginia, William Campbell fought in Lord Dunmore's War (under the command of Captain Walter Crockett). When Montgomery County, Virginia was formed in 1776, his land and that of his uncles fell into this new county. In 1779 he migrated with his uncles to Washington County, North Carolina (now in the State of Tennessee). He and his relatives settled in the vicinity of Big Limestone Creek, in the western part of Washington County. In October 1780, he served as a private in Colonel John Sevier's Regiment at the Battle of King's Mountain. In many books concerning the Battle of King's Mountain he is usually referred to as "William Campbell Jr." to distinguish him was his older and much more famous distant kinsman, Colonel William Campbell (later promoted to Brigadier General by the Virginia Legislature), who was the overall battlefield commander for the American forces. After the Revolution, William was commissioned as a captain in the Virginia Militia and henceforward was usually known as "Captain Campbell." He is shown on a list of officers of the 1st Regiment on 10 July 1787 as a captain (probably acting in that capacity). He was officially recommended captain on 13 February 1788 with commission probably issued on 19 April 1788. He is shown in the Fayette County, Virginia tax lists for 1789 and 1791-1792 as a "Captain." On 9 August 1792, Governor Shelby commissioned William as a Captain in the Kentucky Militia for Fayette County. His new commission was necessitated by the fact that Kentucky became a State (separate from Virginia) on 1 June 1792.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes for Mary Elizabeth Ellison:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

Mary Elizabeth Ellison - Wife of Captain William Campbell

About the year 1770, Captain William Campbell married Mary Elizabeth Ellison in Augusta County, Virginia. His wife, usually known as "Elizabeth," was also born in Augusta County, Virginia in the year 1755. Elizabeth Ellison's family was, like William Campbell's, of Scotch-Irish origin. The spelling of the surname "Ellison" is also frequently rendered as "Allison." Authorities on Scotch-Irish surnames indicate that, in Ireland, the names Ellison and Allison are virtually interchangeable. The names of the parents of Elizabeth Ellison are not known. Other members of the "Black David" branch of the Campbell family have married people with an Ellison or Allison surname and they are probably all closely related to each other. In particular, Mary, the sister of Captain William Campbell, married a man named William Ellison. Elizabeth Campbell outlived her husband by about twenty-five years, dying in Gallatin County, Illinois in the year 1825.

Children of William Campbell and Mary Ellison are:

+ 39 i. David4 Campbell, born October 1772 in Botetourt County VA; died 1838 in Callaway County MO.

40 ii. John Campbell, born 1774 in Fincastle County VA; died Bef. 1804 in Fayette County KY.

+ 41 iii. Jane Campbell, born 22 October 1776 in Montgomery County VA; died August 1851 in Muhlenberg County KY.

+ 42 iv. Anne Campbell, born Abt. 1780 in Washington County NC.

+ 43 v. Charles Campbell, born 28 June 1782 in Washington County NC; died 09 September 1821 in Muhlenberg County KY.

44 vi. William C. Campbell, born Abt. 1787 in Fayette County KY.

45 vii. Elizabeth (Betsy) Campbell, born Abt. 1790 in Fayette County KY. She married Joseph Hays 12 November 1822 in Gallatin County IL; born 1785; died 13 April 1852 in Gallatin County IL.

46 viii. Mary Campbell, born Abt. 1796 in Fayette County KY; died 31 October 1834 in Gallatin County IL. She married Timothy Guard 06 December 1821 in Muhlenberg County KY; born Abt. 1781; died 1843 in Gallatin County IL.

47 ix. Sarah (Sallie) Campbell, born Abt. 1797 in Fayette County KY; died Abt. 1845 in Gallatin County IL. She married Challon Guard 27 September 1823 in Gallatin County IL; born 1797; died 1885 in Gallatin County IL.

+ 48 x. Martha M. Campbell, born 1798 in Fayette County KY; died 1841 in Gallatin County IL.

 

22. Martha (Molly)3 Campbell (David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 1750 in Augusta County VA, and died 02 July 1825 in Fayette County KY. She married John (Major John) Morrison Abt. 1770 in Augusta County VA. He was born Abt. 1745 in Queen Ann County PA, and died 26 January 1814 in Fayette County KY.

Notes for Martha (Molly) Campbell:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

MARTHA (MOLLY) CAMPBELL (1750-1825)

Martha Campbell married Major John Morrison (1740-1814) in Augusta County, Virginia about the year 1770. The couple moved first to eastern Tennessee; soon thereafter, John and Martha removed to Fayette County, Kentucky, arriving in April 1779. They settled within a small fort on the site where the City of Lexington now stands. Martha was the first white woman to permanently reside at the fort and her son, John Morrison, Jr., was the first white child to be born (1780) in Lexington, Kentucky. Martha and John had a total of nine children.

 

Notes for John (Major John) Morrison:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

MAJOR JOHN MORRISON

John Morrison was a noted soldier, Indian fighter and woodsman. In the Revolutionary War, he fought for a time under George Rogers Clark and also served as a soldier in the Virginia Continental Line for three years. Morrison particularly distinguished himself at the Battle of Long Island Flats on the Holston River in East Tennessee (20 July 1776). At the Battle of Piqua (1780), he shot and loaded 13 times (an extraordinary feat!) and was shot in the ear; the well-known frontiersman, Josiah Collins, considering this feat, referred to him as "a brave man." On 04 July 1792, Isaac Shelby, Governor of the State of Kentucky, commissioned John as 1st Major of the 9th Regiment, Fayette County Militia.

Governor David Campbell's Assessment of Major Morrison:

David Campbell (1779-1859), Governor of Virginia from 1837-1840, made the following assessment of Major Morrison in a letter to Lyman Draper in 1842:

" Captain John Morrison was afterwards among the first immigrants to Kentucky and settled a farm near Lexington where he resided until his death. He was Major John Morrison in Kentucky and performed much service in campaigns against the Indians - a plain unpretending man of great worth and the most dauntless courage. His wife was the sister of Col David Campbell of Campbell's Station, Ten. and the first white woman that settled near Lexington. His two sons [Archibald and John] commanded companies in Col Dudley's regiment during the last war [War of 1812]. Archibald was shot all to pieces almost in Dudley's defeat and John and nearly all his company were killed "

Children of Martha Campbell and John Morrison are:

49 i. Archibald (Captain Archibald)4 Morrison, born 17 November 1771 in Augusta County VA; died 01 July 1829 in Woodford County KY. He married Elizabeth ______.

50 ii. Jane Morrison, born Abt. 1775. She married Nathaniel Hodge.

51 iii. Mary (Polly) Morrison, born 02 December 1777 in Washington County VA; died 1842. She married _______ Hanna Aft. 1814.

52 iv. John (Captain John) C. Morrison, born Abt. 1780 in Lexington, Fayette County KY; died 05 May 1813 in Battle of Dudley's Defeat in OH. He married Unmarried.

53 v. Sarah (Sally) Morrison, born 01 October 1781 in Fayette County KY; died 12 October 1855 in Fayette County KY. She married Charles L. Campbell 23 June 1815 in Fayette County KY.

54 vi. Colonel Robert Morrison, born Abt. 1782 in Fayette County KY; died 12 March 1850 in Butler County KY. He married Unmarried.

55 vii. Ann ("Nancy") Morrison, born Abt. 1785. She married William Hayes.

56 viii. David C. Morrison, born Abt. 1790 in Fayette County KY; died 1837 in Fayette County KY. He married (1) Nancy Irvine. He married (2) Margaret Clark. He married (3) Sarah H. Young 21 June 1834 in Jessamine County KY.

57 ix. Martha (Patsey) Morrison, born Abt. 1797 in Fayette County KY; died 15 October 1860 in Fayette County KY. She married Unmarried.

 

24. David (Colonel David)3 Campbell (David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born August 1753 in Augusta County VA, and died 24 November 1832 in Wilson County TN. He married (1) Margaret Campbell 1774 in VA Colony, daughter of David Campbell and Mary Hamilton. She was born 31 March 1748 in Augusta County VA, and died 29 July 1799 in Knox County TN. He married (2) Jane Montgomery 1803 in TN. She was born Abt. 1770, and died 18 September 1840 in Wilson County TN.

Notes for David (Colonel David) Campbell:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

COLONEL DAVID CAMPBELL (1753-1832) OF CAMPBELL'S STATION

David was the youngest child of Black David Campbell having been born in August 1753 only a few months before the death of his father in November of the same year. Like his brother, he was raised by his uncles, William, Robert and Alexander. In 1774, he married Margaret Campbell, a daughter of White David Campbell, and settled on a small farm in the vicinity of the modern day town of Abingdon. In about 1782, David and Margaret removed to Washington County, North Carolina (now part of Tennessee). On 23 October 1782, David patented 153 acres of land on the east side of the "Mirey" branch of the Big Limestone, near land also patented by Charles Allison in 1782. David was then living in the same area as his brother William, and his uncles, Robert and Alexander.

Campbell's Station

In 1785, David and his wife moved to what was then Greene County, North Carolina, but is now Knox County, Tennessee. Together with three of David's cousins ("Elder David" Campbell, Alexander Campbell and "Big Jimmie" Campbell), they founded "Campbell's Station" located on Turkey Creek, a few miles southwest of the site of modern-day Knoxville. In 1787, David obtained a patent from the State of North Carolina, for 500 acres of land on Turkey Creek.

Military Service:

David served in Lord Dunmore's War (1774) and in the Revolutionary War. He served as a private at the Battle of Long Island Flats (July 1776) and at King's Mountain (October 1780). David was made a Captain of the Knox County Militia by Territorial Governor William Blount in 1792. After Tennessee became a state, Governor John Sevier appointed him a 2nd Major in the Tennessee Militia for Knox County ( 04 October 1796). He was appointed Lieutenant Colonel Commandant of the Knox County Militia on 20 December 1800.

Political Service:

David remained in Tennessee after his brother and uncles removed to Fayette County, Virginia (now Kentucky) in 1784. He participated in the government of the independent "State of Franklin" as a member of the Franklin Assembly. In 1787 he represented Greene County in the North Carolina General Assembly. After Tennessee was admitted to the Union, he was elected to the Tennessee State Legislature, representing Knox County in the forth and fifth General Assemblies (1801-1805).

Wives and Children:

David's wife Margaret died on 29 July 1799. In September 1803, he married, as his second wife, Jane Montgomery Cowan, widow of Samuel Cowan of Knox County. He and his second wife moved to Wilson County, Tennessee in the year 1823, where he acquired a 600 acre farm about seven miles from the City of Lebanon, Tennessee. Colonel Campbell died on 18 August 1832 and is buried in the village cemetery at Leeville, Tennessee. His second wife, Jane, died on 18 September 1840. Colonel Campbell had seven children by his first wife and three by his second. One of his daughters, Mary Hamilton Campbell, married Governor David Campbell (1779-1859) of Virginia: this David was a grandson of White David Campbell and served as Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 1837-1840.

Children of David Campbell and Margaret Campbell are:

58 i. William4 Campbell.

59 ii. Elizabeth Campbell.

60 iii. Samuel Campbell.

61 iv. Arthur Campbell.

62 v. Jane Campbell. She married Colonel Charles Wright.

63 vi. John Campbell, born 1777; died 1859 in AK. He married Emeline Cowen.

+ 64 vii. David Campbell, born 04 March 1781 in Washington County NC; died 18 June 1841 in Smith County TN.

65 viii. Mary Hamilton Campbell, born 22 February 1783; died 06 October 1859 in Washington County VA. She married David (Governor David of VA) Campbell 1799 in Knox County TN; born 07 August 1779 in Washington County VA; died 19 March 1859 in Washington County VA.

Notes for David (Governor David of VA) Campbell:

 

The following sketch of Governor David Campbell is found at pages 766-767 of the book "History of Southwest Virginia" (published 1903), by Lewis Preston Summers:

"DAVID CAMPBELL

"The subject of this sketch was the eldest son of John Campbell and Elizabeth McDonald, his wife, of Hall's Bottom, Washington County, Virginia, and was born on the 2d of August, 1779, at Royal Oak (now in Smyth county), and was about eight years old when his father removed to Hall's Bottom. There he grew up, receiving such education as the frontier settlements could provide. In the year 1794, in his fifteenth year, he was appointed an Ensign in Captain John Davis's company of militia. In 1799 he was commissioned a captain of a company of light infantry assigned to the Seventieth Regiment of Militia, and in the fall of the same year he married his cousin, Mary Hamilton [Comment: Mary was the daughter of Colonel David Campbell of Campbell's Station, Tennessee]. He studied law, and was licensed, but never practiced his profession. In 1802 he was appointed deputy clerk of the County Court of Washington county, and chiefly discharged the duties of the office to the year 1812. On the 6th of July, 1812, he was commissioned a major in the Twelfth Regiment of Infantry, United States army, and marched with the forces to the lakes of Canada, where he served under Generals Alexander Smyth and Van Rensselaer. On the 12th of March, 1813, he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the Thirtieth Regiment, where he served until the year 1814, when he resigned his commission. Upon his return home he entered the service of Virginia as aide-de-camp to Governor Barbour, and gave valuable assistance to organizing the large military forces called into service in the summer of 1814. In the year 1815 he was elected by the General Assembly as general of the Third Brigade of the Virginia Militia. On the 25th of January, 1815 he was appointed colonel of the Third Virginia Cavalry, and was afterward transferred to the Fifth Regiment of Cavalry. Upon his return to Abingdon, he entered the clerk's office, where he remained until 1820, when he was elected a member of the State Senate from the Abingdon district for the term of four years. In 1824 he was elected clerk of the County Court of Washington county, which position he occupied until he took his seat as Governor of Virginia, on the 31st of March, 1837. Governor Campbell, at the time of his election, was a Jacksonian Democrat, but while Governor, and during the administration of President Van Buren, the sub-treasury scheme and the standing army bill, as they were commonly called, were made party measures, and being opposed to them, he warmly supported General Harrison in the presidential campaign of 1840, and ever after acted with the Whig party. Governor Campbell, in his first message to the General Assembly, proposed the establishment of the common school system, of which he was one of the earliest advocates. Upon his retirement from the position of Governor of the Commonwealth, he was commissioned a justice of the peace for Washington county, and was diligent in the discharge of his duties as such until the year 1852, when he returned to private life, after having spent nearly one-half a century in the public service. In person Governor Campbell was about five feet eleven inches in height, spare and erect in carriage, with dark hair and eyes and intellectual countenance and pleasing manners. He died at "Mont Calm," his home, now the home of Colonel Cummings, on March 19th, 1859, without issue, and his remains were interred in Sinking Spring Cemetery, Abingdon, Virginia."

WILL OF GOVERNOR DAVID CAMPBELL

David Campbell's will, dated 4 February 1857, with codicil dated 7 September 1857, was probated in Washington County VA on 29 March 1859. [See Washington County VA, Will Book 14, pages 402-407.]

Children of David Campbell and Jane Montgomery are:

66 i. Warren4 Campbell.

67 ii. Washington Campbell.

+ 68 iii. Margaret Lavinia Campbell, born 30 April 1805; died 29 October 1877.

 

25. James (Big Jimmie)3 Campbell (Robert2, Alexander1) was born 15 February 1759 in Augusta County VA, and died 08 April 1844 in Knox County TN. He married Janet (Jane) Allison 06 October 1779 in Washington County NC. She was born Abt. 1759, and died Aft. 1850 in Knox County TN.

Children of James Campbell and Janet Allison are:

69 i. John4 Campbell. He married Jane Reed 04 June 1812 in Knox County TN.

70 ii. Robert Campbell. He married Elizabeth (Betsy) Gamble 26 August 1811 in Knox County TN.

71 iii. William Campbell.

72 iv. Ann (Nancy) Campbell, born 27 August 1788.

73 v. James Campbell, born 07 May 1790 in Knox County TN; died 17 May 1847 in Lamar County TX. He married Mary Stewart Abt. 1816; born 04 March 1793; died 1857.

74 vi. Alexander Campbell, born 1797; died Aft. 1850. He married Lucinda Wells 05 January 1825 in Knox County TN; born 1800.

 

26. Alexander (Captain Alexander)3 Campbell (Robert2, Alexander1) was born Abt. 1760 in Augusta County VA, and died 07 September 1816 in Knox County TN. He married Mary Lockhart 1781, daughter of William Lockhart and Mary Campbell. She was born 12 March 1766, and died 12 March 1842 in Knox County TN.

Children of Alexander Campbell and Mary Lockhart are:

75 i. Margaret4 Campbell, born 1783; died Aft. 1816. She married (1) William Dowler 1806; died 1814. She married (2) Solomon McCampbell 28 November 1815; died 1845 in Alabama.

76 ii. William Campbell, born 29 October 1785 in Greene County NC; died 15 February 1828 in Knox County TN. He married Elizabeth (Betesy) Goddard 20 July 1815; born 06 June 1792; died 11 May 1864.

77 iii. Mary Campbell, born 1788; died Bef. 1850. She married John Hunter 19 April 1806.

78 iv. Jane Campbell, born 1790; died 05 November 1830. She married William Goddard; born 1788; died September 1836.

79 v. Elizabeth (Betsey) Lockhart Campbell, born 07 November 1792 in Knox County TN; died 16 July 1871 in Strawberry Plains TN. She married Daniel Meek 11 March 1813; born 20 March 1792; died 20 August 1860.

80 vi. James Campbell, born 06 June 1796 in Knox County TN; died 25 May 1879 in Knox County TN. He married (1) Penelope (Patsey) Hazelwood 09 October 1822 in Knox County TN; died Abt. 1824. He married (2) Charlotte Dardis 11 August 1825; born 1800; died 23 April 1870.

81 vii. Ann Campbell, born 1799 in Knox County TN; died 28 October 1856. She married John Goddard 25 January 1820; died 11 July 1826 in Tuscumbia Alabama.

82 viii. Cynthia H. Campbell, born 1800; died 20 October 1875 in Knox County TN. She married Thomas (Colonel Thomas) Rogers 11 June 1823; died 22 December 1870 in Knox County TN.

83 ix. John Campbell, born 1804 in Knox County TN; died May 1876 in Cherekee County AL. He married Elizabeth Armstrong 29 June 1829 in Knox County TN; born 05 April 1811 in Knox County TN; died 1865 in Birmingham AL.

84 x. Harriet Campbell, born 12 March 1806 in Knox County TN; died 27 July 1827 in New Market TN. She married (1) Alexander Blackburn; died 1846. She married (2) Henry H. Peck 05 September 1850.

 

27. David (Elder David)3 Campbell (Robert2, Alexander1) was born August 1762 in Augusta County VA, and died 1813 in Knox County TN. He married Janet (Jean) Lockhart 11 December 1785 in Greene County TN, daughter of William Lockhart and Mary Campbell. She was born Abt. 1768 in Virginia, and died 17 January 1842 in Knox County TN.

Children of David Campbell and Janet Lockhart are:

85 i. William Lockhart4 Campbell, born 28 October 1786 in Greene County NC.

86 ii. Alexander Campbell, born 09 April 1789; died 17 October 1845. He married Mary W. Strain 18 October 1809 in Knox County TN; born 1788; died 1855.

87 iii. Mary L. Campbell, born 23 April 1791.

88 iv. Margaret M. Campbell, born 07 April 1793. She married Robert Perry 02 October 1835 in Knox County TN.

89 v. James (Little Jimmy) Campbell, born 21 June 1795 in Knox County TN; died 12 October 1876 in Texas. He married Sarah Smith 20 March 1824 in Knox County TN; born 08 January 1806; died 13 August 1874 in Texas.

90 vi. Jane (Jeanie) Campbell, born 15 November 1797 in Knox County TN. She married Dimeon Lane 25 July 1815 in Knox County TN.

91 vii. David Campbell, born 01 January 1800. He married Jane Smith 04 December 1823 in Knox County TN.

92 viii. Elizabeth (Betsy) Campbell, born 27 June 1802 in Knox County TN; died Aft. 1870 in Bradley County TN. She married John W. Wilson 01 August 1820 in Blount County TN; born 14 August 1797 in Greene County TN; died Abt. 1859 in Bradley County TN.

93 ix. John Steele Campbell, born 23 May 1808 in Knox County TN; died 20 July 1897 in Knox County TN. He married (1) Nancy Smith 07 February 1828 in Knox County TN; born 14 November 1807; died 08 July 1856 in Knox County TN. He married (2) Elizabeth Jane Henry August 1860 in Knox County TN; born 25 August 1828 in Blount County TN; died 27 December 1897 in Knox County TN.

 

28. John R.3 Campbell (Robert2, Alexander1) was born Abt. 1772 in Augusta County VA, and died 07 October 1847 in Mount Sterling KY. He married Margaret F. Self Abt. 1800 in KY. She was born Abt. 1782.

Notes for John R. Campbell:

John R. Campbell seems to have been the son of Robert Campbell, the brother of Black David Campbell (d. 1753) of Augusta County, Virginia. One of John's sons was James Morrison Campbell. The life of James Morrison Campbell is sketched in the "History of McDonough County, Illinois" (published 1885), at pages 277-278. That book, although containing several errors pertaining to James's father and grandfather [see my comments in brackets], provides some valuable information as follows:

"James Morrison Campbell, the oldest settler in Macomb, still living there, is a native of Frankfort, Kentucky, and was born August 22, 1803. His parents were John R. and Margaret F. (Self) Campbell. His grandfather, Robert Campbell, came to this country from Argyleshire, Scotland in 1773 [Comment: Based on my research, I believe that the year 1743 is more likely the correct date], and when two years later, war with England commenced, he took up arms against the mother country. Robert Campbell settled in Virginia where both parents of James were born. They moved to Kentucky, about the beginning of this century [Comment: Based on my research, I believe the year they moved to KY was 1784) and when the son was about four years old, the family moved from Frankfort to Mecklenburg county [Comment: Based upon my research, this should be Muhlenburg county], where they remained about two years.

"In 1809, John R. Campbell, who was a blacksmith by trade, came into this state and settled at Shawneetown, and while there in 1812 and two years subsequently, was a lieutenant of rangers [Comment: Some sources state that John was a Lieutenant of the regular forces], fighting against the Indians, whom the British had instigated to raise the war hoop. When peace was declared Lieutenant Campbell did not return immediately, and his wife supposing him to be dead, returned with her little family of three children to the old home in Frankfort. To her joy her husband soon joined her."

The reason John did not immediately return to his family is that he was seriously wounded in the Battle of Campbell's Island. This battle took place on 10 July 1814, on an island in the Mississippi River, near the modern city of East Moline, Illinois. The location is close to the point where the Rock River flows into the Mississippi. The following are four versions of that battle:

1) BATTLE OF CAMPBELL'S ISLAND - MISSOURI GAZETTE ACCOUNT

Probably the best and most accurate account of the battle was the one published in the Missouri Gazette on 30 July 1814. The newspaper account has been preserved by Frank E. Stevens in his book "The Blackhawk War" (published 1903), pages 48-49. The following is extracted from that account:

" ... It was thought proper by Brigadier-General Howard ... to send a force to relieve the volunteers ... For this purpose, Lieut. John Campbell of the first regulars, acting as brigade major, was entrusted with the command of 42 regulars and 65 rangers, in three keel boats ... The whole party, including boatmen and women, amounting to about 133, reached Rock River ... without any accident. As soon as they entered the rapids they were visited by hundreds of Sacs and Foxes ... The officers, being unacquainted with Indian manners, imagined the savages to be friendly; to this fatal security may be attributed the catastrophe which followed. ... the rangers in two barges ... had proceeded two miles in advance of the commander's barge; the latter inclined to the east side in search of the main channel, and being now on a lee shore, proceeded with much difficulty, and as the gale increased were drifted into shoal water within a few yards of a high bank covered with grass, waist high; a few steps from the bow and stern an umbrage of willows set out from the shore.

"In this position the commanding officer thought proper to remain until the wind abated; sentries were placed at proper intervals, and the men were occupied in cooking, when the report of several guns announced an attack. At the first fire all the sentries were killed, and before those on shore could reach the barge, 10 or 15 out of 30 were killed and wounded. At this time the force and intentions of the Indians were fully developed. On each shore the savages were observed in quick motion; some in canoes crossing to the battleground; others were observed running from above and below to the scene of attack; in a few minutes from five to seven hundred were assembled on the bank and among the willows within a few yards of the bow and stern of the barge; the Indians gave the whoop, and commenced a tremendous fire; the brave men in the barge cheered, and returned the fire from a swivel and small arms. At this critical juncture, Lieuts. Riggs and Rector of the rangers, who commanded the two barges ahead, did not hear the guns, but saw the smoke and concluding an attack was made, dropped down. Rigg's boat stranded about 100 yards below Campbell's, and rector, to avoid a like misfortune and preserve himself from a raking fire, anchored above; both barges opened a brisk fire on the Indians, but as the enemy fired from cover, it is thought little execution was done.

"About one hour was spent in this unequal contest, when Campbell's barge was discovered on fire, to relieve which Rector cut his cable and fell to windward of him and took out the survivors. Finding he could not assist Riggs, having a number of wounded on board, and in danger of running on a lee shore, he made the best of his way to this place, where he arrived on Sunday evening last.

"There were 3 regulars killed and 14 wounded; 2 died on their passage to this place; 1 ranger killed and four wounded on board Lieut. Rector's barge. Brig. Maj. Campbell and Dr. Stewart are severely wounded. Two women and a child were severely wounded -- one of the women and a child are since dead. ... "

2) BATTLE OF CAMPBELL'S ISLAND - PER CECIL EBY

The following is a quotation from the book entitled "That Disgraceful Affair, the Black Hawk War," by Cecil Eby (published 1973), pages 58-60. The reference concerns the "Dog Prairie Campaign of Governor William Clark of Missouri Territory, which took place during the War of 1812, in July 1813. It should be noted that Mr. Eby is an ardent supporter of the Indian version of events, hence his account is definitely slanted in that direction and against the conduct of Lieutenant John R. Campbell.

" ... Collecting forty regulars and sixty-odd rangers, he put them under the command of Lieutenant John Campbell, who set off from Shallow Water on July 4. ... On the evening before the surrender of [the American] Fort Shelby [20 July 1813], Lieutenant Campbell's force, in three keelboats, reached the mouth of the Rock River, nearly two hundred miles south of Prairie du Chien. Invited ashore by the Sauk, who had not yet heard of the British presence far upriver, the Americans "used and gave us, plenty of whiskey," Black Hawk later reported. After the Chemokemons had returned to their boats for the night, a messenger reached Saukenuk bring news of the fight at Prairie du Chien--and a gift of six kegs of powder so that the Sauk could join battle. After a year of peace, Black Hawk entered the war again.

"Throughout the following day parties of Sauk and Fox stalked the keelboats from the dense willow undergrowth along the Illinois shore, waiting for an opportunity to strike. After a day of hard poling, and two nights of hard likkering, the Campbell flotilla had gotten above the rapids north of Rock Island. On the following morning, July 21, most of the Americans were under the weather, in more than one sense. Gale winds blew up from the west and dispersed the keelboats; Campbell dropped far astern. The boat went hard aground on a boggy island bristling with Indians who opened fire at point-blank range from behind a screen of underbrush. Black Hawk himself set the sail on fire with a flaming arrow. Because of the wind, the other keelboats heard no shots; but when Lieutenant Stephen Rector saw smoke billowing over the island behind him, he returned, dropped anchor, and swung in close to the burning boat. In attempting the same maneuver, Lieutenant Johnathan Riggs, in the third keelboat, dragged anchor and went ashore a hundred yards below Campbell.

"To provide cover, Rector raked the thicket with his swivel gun and took off the still able-bodied of Campbell's men, leaving the dead and the seriously wounded on the burning craft. Campbell himself, who subsequently confessed that he was ill--that is to say, drunk--during the fight, was badly wounded as he was being hoisted aboard Rector's boat. [see note below] Cutting his cable, Rector then promptly headed for St. Louis under oar, leaving Riggs to fend for himself. Riggs waited, playing possum, before opening fire when the Indians rushed his boat en masse. The attackers fell back with two dead (one of them a squaw)--the only American kills of the encounter. Later Riggs men pushed the boat off and returned to St. Louis, much to the surprise of Rector, who had reported the keelboat destroyed. ... All told, the Americans lost sixteen dead and twenty wounded at Campbell's Island."

Footnote to the above --"While a fearless giant of a man, Lieutenant Campbell was nonetheless a notorious drunkard. For many years afterward the "Hero of Campbell's Island" was a featured exhibit in many a Missouri grogshop. Today the site of the battle, surrounded by trailers and shanties on Campbell's Island in East Moline, is marked by a commemorative stone and plaque, making no mention of the besotted condition of the lieutenant or his crew."

3) BATTLE OF CAMPBELL'S ISLAND - CHIEF BLACKHAWK'S ACCOUNT

Chief Blackhawk, the leader of the Indian forces at the Battle of Campbell's Island, dictated his autobiography to a U. S. Government Interpreter in 1833. That document contains Blackhawk's recollections of the battle as follows:

" ... five or six boats arrived, loaded with soldiers, going to Prairie du Chien, to reinforce the garrison. They appeared friendly, and were well received. We held a council with the war chief [Campbell]. We had no intention of hurting him, or any of his party, or we could have easily defeated them. They remained with us all day, and gave us plenty of whiskey! During the night a party arrived (who came down the Rock river), and brought us six kegs of powder! They told us that the British had gone to Prairie du Chien, and taken the fort, and wished to join them again in the war, which we agreed to. I collected my warriors, and determined to pursue the boats, which had sailed with a fair wind. If we had known the day before, we could easily taken them all, as the war chief used no precautions to prevent it. I immediately started with my party, by land, in pursuit - thinking that some of there boats might get aground, or that the Great Spirit would put them in our power, if he wished them taken, and their people killed. ... I soon discovered ... one boat ... driven ashore by the wind. They landed, by running hard aground, and lowered their sail. The others passed on. This boat the great Spirit gave us! We approached cautiously, and fired upon the men on shore. All that could, hurried aboard, but they were unable to push off, being fast aground. We advanced to the river's bank, under cover, and commenced firing at the boat. ... I prepared my bow and arrows to throw fire to the sail, ... succeeded in setting the sail on fire.

"The boat was soon in flames! About this time, one of the boats that had passed, returned, dropped anchor, and swung in close to the boat on fire, and took off all the people, except those killed and badly wounded. We could distinctly see them passing from one boat to the other, and fired on them with good aim. We wounded the war chief [Campbell] in this way! Another boat now came down, dropped her anchor, which did not take hold, and was drifted ashore! The other boat cut her cable and rowed down the river, leaving their comrades without attempting to assist them. We then commenced an attack on this boat, and fired several rounds. They did not return the fire. We thought they were afraid, or had but a small number on board. I therefore ordered a rush to the boat. When we got near, they fired, and killed two of our people, being all that we had lost in the engagement. Some of their men jumped out and pushed off the boat, and thus got away without losing a man! I had a good opinion of this war chief - he managed so much better than the others. It would give me pleasure to shake him by the hand."

4) BATTLE OF CAMPBELL'S ISLAND -- GOVERNOR REYNOLD'S ACCOUNT

The following extract is taken from "History of Davenport and Scott County, Iowa" (first published in 1910), by Harry E. Downer, pages 74-76:

"Battle of Campbell's Island

" ... At this time General Benjamin Howard was in command of the military District extending from the interior of Indiana to the frontier of Mexico. After the return of Governor Clark from Prairie du Chien, and it appears, prior to the receipt of news of the engagement at that place, General Howard fitted out an expedition, under the command of Captain John Campbell [Phil Norfleet Note: Campbell was actually a Lieutenant], First United States Infantry, to proceed to Prairie du Chien and strengthen the garrison at that place. The expedition consisted of forty-two regulars, sixty-six rangers and about twenty-one other persons, including boatmen, women and the sutler's establishment. This expedition left St. Louis early in July 1814, and proceeded up the river in three keel-boats as far as Rock Island, near which place it was attacked by the Indians and nearly destroyed. The following account of this expedition is taken from Governor Reynolds's "Life and Times."

"Lieutenant Campbell commanded the boat with the regulars and Captain Stephen Rector and Lieutenant Riggs the other two barges manned by the rangers. The expedition reached Rock Island in peace, but the Sac and Fox Indians, in great numbers, swarmed around the boats but still professed peace. The barge commanded by Rector was navigated mostly by the French of Cahokia, and were both good sailors and soldiers; and the same may be said of the company under Lieutenant Riggs, except as to the knowledge of navigation. The boats lay still all night at or near the Sac and Fox villages at Rock Island and the Indians were all night making hollow professions of friendship. Many of the French, after the battle, informed me that they knew the Indians would attack the boats, and accordingly they informed Lieutenant Campbell, but he disbelieved them. The French said that the Indians wanted them to leave the Americans and go home. They would squeeze the hands of the French and pull their hands down the river, indicating to leave. The Indians disliked to fight their old friends the French.

"The fleet set sail in the morning and above Rock Island the wind blew so hard that Campbell's boat was forced on a lee shore and lodged on a small island near the mainland, known from this circumstance as "Campbell's Island." The Indians, commanded by Black Hawk, when the wind drifted the boat on shore, commenced an attack on it. The boats of Rector and Riggs were ahead and could see the smoke of the fire arms, but could not hear the report of the guns. They returned to assist Campbell but the wind was so high that their barges were almost unmanageable. They anchored near Campbell but could not reach him, the storm raged so severely. When Campbell's boat was driven ashore by the wind he placed out sentinels and the men commenced cooking their breakfast; but the enemy in hundreds rushed on them, killing many on the spot, and the rest took refuge in the boat. Hundreds and hundreds of the warriors were on and around the boat and set it on fire. Campbell's boat was burning and the bottom covered with the dead, the wounded and blood. They had almost ceased firing when Rector and his brave men nobly came to the rescue. Campbell himself lay wounded on his back in the bottom of the boat and many of his men dead and dying around him. Riggs's boat was well fortified but his men were inexperienced sailors. Rector and company could not remain inactive spectators of the destruction of Campbell and men, but in a tempest of wind raised their anchor in the face of almost a thousand Indians and periled their lives in the rescue of Campbell. No act of noble daring and bravery surpassed the rescue of Campbell during the war in the west. The rangers under Rector were mostly Frenchmen and were well acquainted with the management of a boat in such a crisis. Rector and his men were governed by the high and ennobling principles of chivalry and patriotism. Rector's boat was lightened by casting overboard quantities of provisions and then many of the crew actually got out of the boat into the water, leaving the vessel between them and the fire of the enemy and pushed their boat against the fire of the warriors to Campbell's boat which was in possession of the Indians. This was a most hazardous exploit for forty men, forcing their barge to a burning boat in possession of the enemy, nearly a thousand strong, and taking from it the wounded and living soldiers, together with their commander.

Wounded Men Are Rescued

"A salt -water sailor by the name of Hoadly did gallant service in this daring enterprise by his superior knowledge of the management of a vessel. Rector took all of the live men from Campbell's boat into his; and his men, in the water, hauled their own boat out into the stream. The Indians feasted on the abandoned boat of Campbell. Rector had his boat crowded with the wounded and dying but rowed night and day until they reached St. Louis. It was supposed the boat of Riggs was captured by the enemy; but the vessel was strongly fortified so that it lay, as it were, in the hands of the Indians for several hours; but the wind in the evening subsided and Riggs got his boat off without losing many men. It was a general jubilee and rejoicing when Riggs arrived at St. Louis; the hearts of the people swelled with patriotic joy to know that the lives of so many brave soldiers were saved by the courage and energies of Rector, Riggs and their troops. I saw soldiers on their return to St. Louis and the sight was distressing. Those who were not wounded were worn down to skeletons by labor and fatigue. ... "

 

Children of John Campbell and Margaret Self are:

94 i. John4 Campbell, born Abt. 1811 in Shawneetown IL; died 06 October 1844 in Mount Sterling KY.

95 ii. Ann Campbell, born Abt. 1825 in KY; died 23 October 1846 in Lexington KY.

 

29. Margaret3 Campbell (Robert2, Alexander1) was born 28 November 1774, and died 04 October 1853 in Calloway County MO. She married David Campbell 14 February 1793 in Fayette County KY, son of William Campbell and Mary Ellison. He was born October 1772 in Botetourt County VA, and died 1838 in Callaway County MO.

Notes for David Campbell:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

DAVID CAMPBELL (1772-1838) OF MUHLENBERG COUNTY KY

David Campbell of Muhlenberg County, Kentucky was born in the year 1772, in what was then Botetourt County, in that part of Southwest Virginia lying on the South Fork of the Holston River. He was the eldest son of Captain William Campbell (1748-1800) and Mary Elizabeth Ellison (1755-1825).

Margaret Campbell, Wife of David Campbell:

David's wife, Margaret Campbell (1774-1853), was the daughter of David's great-uncle, Robert Campbell. William Campbell of Santa Clara tell us the following concerning his mother:

"Mother's father was an uncle to grandfather on father's side. Mother was by a second marriage. Her mother's name was Margaret Killpateric."

Margaret Campbell Pilcher states the following concerning David Campbell and his wife:

"David Campbell married Mary Campbell. They had three children: William, David and Margaret Campbell."

Although Mrs. Pilcher states that her first name was Mary, every document, which I have been able to find, refers to her as "Margaret." It is possible that her full name was Mary Margaret Campbell, she being called by her middle name. David probably married her in Fayette County, Kentucky about the year 1792.

Although, Mrs. Pilcher mentions only three names, David and Margaret actually had thirteen children. David's eldest son, William Campbell (1793-1885) of Santa Clara, tells us the names of these children:

"Father's family: I am the oldest, and was born the 12th of November 1793; John; Rice; Jane; Charles; David and Margaret (twins); Betsey; Mary; James; Robert; Ann, who died at 2 years of age; and Thomas - thirteen in all. Rice and David died in 1821. Jane died in [18]53 in Illinois; James died in Oregon; Robert and Charles died in California."

Emigration to Muhlenberg County, Kentucky:

About the year 1803, three years after the death of his father, Captain William Campbell, David and his family removed to Muhlenberg County, Kentucky. In 1805, David's widowed mother, Elizabeth, and most of his brothers and sisters also moved to Muhlenberg County. David spent most of his life in Muhlenberg and operated a tannery at the County Seat, the town of Greenville. David also owned farms, on Elk Pond and Cypress Creeks, in the southern part of the county. The following map shows the general area where David resided.

In April 1808 David Campbell was commissioned a Justice of the Peace for Muhlenberg County, by Kentucky Governor Christopher Greenup. In 1810, David was appointed a trustee of Greenville Academy, a school located in the town of Greenville, established by an Act of the Kentucky Legislature, dated 18 January 1810. In June 1811, David Campbell was commissioned Assistant Judge of the Circuit Court by Kentucky Governor Charles Scott.

Emigration to Callaway County, Missouri:

Late in life, about the year 1831, David Campbell emigrated to Callaway County, Missouri with his wife Margaret, daughter Margaret and at least three of his sons (James, Robert and Thomas). Shortly after the Campbells arrived in Callaway County, David's daughter Margaret married Reverend Abraham Norfleet, on 16 August 1832. David Campbell died testate in Callaway County in about the year 1838. His will, dated 20 February 1836, with codicil dated 20 June 1836, was probated in Callaway County, Missouri on 6 June 1838.

Children of Margaret Campbell and David Campbell are:

96 i. Elizabeth ("Betsy")4 Campbell. She married William R. Givins 12 November 1829 in Muhlenberg County KY.

+ 97 ii. William Campbell, born 12 November 1793 in Fayette County KY; died 12 December 1885 in Tulare County CA.

+ 98 iii. Jane Campbell, born 19 January 1799 in Fayette County KY; died 29 August 1861 in Linn County KS.

99 iv. David Campbell, born 21 April 1803 in Green County Ky; died 1821 in Muhlenberg County KY.

+ 100 v. Margaret Campbell, born 21 April 1803 in Green County KY; died 03 September 1872 in Cole County MO.

+ 101 vi. James Campbell, born 06 April 1807 in Muhlenberg County KY; died 29 July 1873 in Salem OR.

+ 102 vii. Thomas Campbell, born 1816 in Kentucky.

103 viii. Charles Campbell.

Notes for Charles Campbell:

Charles Campbell was a younger brother of William Campbell of Santa Clara CA. In 1839 he apparently was living in Hopkins County, Kentucky. Unfortunately, I know virtually nothing about his life. Charles Campbell also migrated to California; however, I don't know if he went with his brothers in 1846 or came out later.

Charles was in California by 1851 as he is mentioned in a letter written by his nephew, David Lee Campbell (son of David McCord Campbell and Jane Campbell) in that year.

 

30. William (Major William)3 Campbell (Robert2, Alexander1) was born 17 October 1776 in Montgomery County VA, and died 11 January 1842 in Madison County TN. He married Anne Campbell Abt. 1798 in Washington County TN, daughter of William Campbell and Mary Ellison. She was born Abt. 1780 in Washington County NC.

Notes for William (Major William) Campbell:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

Major William Campbell was the grandfather of Brigadier General Alexander W. Campbell and the father of John W. Campbell. He was the son of Robert Campbell and his second wife, Margaret Killpatrick. William was probably born in Montgomery County VA in 1776. He and his father's family soon removed to Washington County NC (later part of TN). His father Robert Campbell, settled in the Big Limestone Creek area where he build a grist mill known locally as Campbell's Mill. Williams father, Robert, died in about 1797 and the mill was sold to a close neighbor, George Gilespie. Soon thereafter William removed to Lexington KY where he married Anne Campbell, daughter of his cousin Captain William Campbell (1748-1800). After several years in Lexington, William and his family removed to the town of Greenville in Muhlenberg County KY. In the early 1820's he moved to Nashville where he lived for several years. In about 1828, he was appointed by President Andrew Jackson as the general agent of the Government as receiver of the rents of the mines at Galena, Illinois. After several years in Illinois, William removed to the town of Jackson in Madison County TN where his son John W. Campbell resided. Major William Campbell died in Jackson in 1842.

The following are excerpts from a biography of General Alexander W. Campbell contained in "Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans" (published 1888), compliled by William S. Speer, pages 27-28:

" ... Maj. William Campbell moved from Lexington to the Green River country in Kentucky, and made his home in Greenville [Muhlenberg County], where he established the first bank in that part of the State, of which he made his son [John W. Campbell], then only nineteen years old, the cashier. ... "

" ... Maj. William Campbell was at one time one of the largest pioneer merchants west of the Alleghanies, his business connections extending from the falls of the Ohio to New Orleans and embracing every important business point on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. The business disasters growing out of the great financial crisis of 1817 so impaired his fortunes that he retired from commercial pursuits and accepted the position of superintendent of the mineral lands of the Northwest, tendered him by Gen Jackson who was his intimate personal and political friend, his headquarters being fixed at Galena, Illinois. While residing here the Black Hawk war broke out, and he was elected to command a battalion of volunteers from the state of Illinois. ... "

Children of William Campbell and Anne Campbell are:

+ 104 i. Cynthia Ann4 Campbell, born Abt. 1797 in Fayette County KY; died Aft. 1883 in Concrete TX.

+ 105 ii. John Williamson Campbell, born 31 May 1799 in Fayette County KY; died 30 June 1874 in City of Jackson, Madison County TN.

106 iii. Robert C. Campbell, born Abt. 1801 in Fayette County KY; died Abt. 1878 in TX.

 

Generation No. 4

31. Hugh W.4 McNary (Ann3 Campbell, Alexander2, Alexander1) was born 26 November 1790 in Fayette County KY, and died 07 October 1872 in Muhlenberg County KY. He married Sarah A. Scott 1822. She was born 16 December 1806 in Columbia SC, and died 15 October 1863 in Muhlenberg County KY.

Children of Hugh McNary and Sarah Scott are:

107 i. William J.5 McNary, born 1825.

108 ii. Samuel F. McNary, born 1827.

109 iii. John A. McNary, born 1832.

110 iv. Anne M. McNary, born 1838.

111 v. Sarah J. McNary, born 1843 in Muhlenberg County KY. She married George W. Eaves October 1864 in Muhlenberg County KY; born 05 February 1840 in Hopkins County KY.

112 vi. Martha M. McNary, born 1846.

 

33. William C.4 McNary (Ann3 Campbell, Alexander2, Alexander1) was born 12 September 1801, and died 19 September 1875 in Muhlenberg County KY. He married Ann B. _____. She was born 1814, and died 23 December 1839 in Muhlenberg County KY.

Children of William McNary and Ann _____ are:

113 i. James E.5 McNary, born 1835.

114 ii. Robert B. Mcnary, born 1839.

115 iii. Ann M. McNary, born 1847.

116 iv. William F. McNary, born 1847.

117 v. James D. McNary, born 1849.

 

35. Sarah4 McNary (Ann3 Campbell, Alexander2, Alexander1) was born 05 September 1799, and died 16 November 1821 in Muhlenberg County KY. She married (2) William Campbell 24 September 1816 in Muhlenberg County KY, son of David Campbell and Margaret Campbell. He was born 12 November 1793 in Fayette County KY, and died 12 December 1885 in Tulare County CA.

Children of Sarah McNary are:

118 i. Ann Laurette5 Campbell, born 24 September 1817; died 16 December 1891 in Santa Clara County CA. She married Ira Joseph Lovell January 1836 in Muhlenberg County KY; born 06 November 1811 in Logan County KY; died 23 April 1898 in Santa Clara County CA.

+ 119 ii. Margaret Jane Campbell, born 01 February 1820; died 30 September 1852 in Santa Clara County CA.

Child of Sarah McNary and William Campbell is:

120 i. Unnamed5 Daughter, born 10 November 1821 in Muhlenberg County KY; died 10 November 1821 in Muhlenberg County KY.

 

39. David4 Campbell (William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born October 1772 in Botetourt County VA, and died 1838 in Callaway County MO. He married Margaret Campbell 14 February 1793 in Fayette County KY, daughter of Robert Campbell and Margaret Killpatrick. She was born 28 November 1774, and died 04 October 1853 in Calloway County MO.

Notes for David Campbell:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

DAVID CAMPBELL (1772-1838) OF MUHLENBERG COUNTY KY

David Campbell of Muhlenberg County, Kentucky was born in the year 1772, in what was then Botetourt County, in that part of Southwest Virginia lying on the South Fork of the Holston River. He was the eldest son of Captain William Campbell (1748-1800) and Mary Elizabeth Ellison (1755-1825).

Margaret Campbell, Wife of David Campbell:

David's wife, Margaret Campbell (1774-1853), was the daughter of David's great-uncle, Robert Campbell. William Campbell of Santa Clara tell us the following concerning his mother:

"Mother's father was an uncle to grandfather on father's side. Mother was by a second marriage. Her mother's name was Margaret Killpateric."

Margaret Campbell Pilcher states the following concerning David Campbell and his wife:

"David Campbell married Mary Campbell. They had three children: William, David and Margaret Campbell."

Although Mrs. Pilcher states that her first name was Mary, every document, which I have been able to find, refers to her as "Margaret." It is possible that her full name was Mary Margaret Campbell, she being called by her middle name. David probably married her in Fayette County, Kentucky about the year 1792.

Although, Mrs. Pilcher mentions only three names, David and Margaret actually had thirteen children. David's eldest son, William Campbell (1793-1885) of Santa Clara, tells us the names of these children:

"Father's family: I am the oldest, and was born the 12th of November 1793; John; Rice; Jane; Charles; David and Margaret (twins); Betsey; Mary; James; Robert; Ann, who died at 2 years of age; and Thomas - thirteen in all. Rice and David died in 1821. Jane died in [18]53 in Illinois; James died in Oregon; Robert and Charles died in California."

Emigration to Muhlenberg County, Kentucky:

About the year 1803, three years after the death of his father, Captain William Campbell, David and his family removed to Muhlenberg County, Kentucky. In 1805, David's widowed mother, Elizabeth, and most of his brothers and sisters also moved to Muhlenberg County. David spent most of his life in Muhlenberg and operated a tannery at the County Seat, the town of Greenville. David also owned farms, on Elk Pond and Cypress Creeks, in the southern part of the county. The following map shows the general area where David resided.

In April 1808 David Campbell was commissioned a Justice of the Peace for Muhlenberg County, by Kentucky Governor Christopher Greenup. In 1810, David was appointed a trustee of Greenville Academy, a school located in the town of Greenville, established by an Act of the Kentucky Legislature, dated 18 January 1810. In June 1811, David Campbell was commissioned Assistant Judge of the Circuit Court by Kentucky Governor Charles Scott.

Emigration to Callaway County, Missouri:

Late in life, about the year 1831, David Campbell emigrated to Callaway County, Missouri with his wife Margaret, daughter Margaret and at least three of his sons (James, Robert and Thomas). Shortly after the Campbells arrived in Callaway County, David's daughter Margaret married Reverend Abraham Norfleet, on 16 August 1832. David Campbell died testate in Callaway County in about the year 1838. His will, dated 20 February 1836, with codicil dated 20 June 1836, was probated in Callaway County, Missouri on 6 June 1838.

Children are listed above under (29) Margaret Campbell.

41. Jane4 Campbell (William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 22 October 1776 in Montgomery County VA, and died August 1851 in Muhlenberg County KY. She married William Martin, son of Thomas Martin and Susannah Walker. He was born 23 December 1776 in Augusta County VA, and died 05 November 1851 in Muhlenberg County KY.

Children of Jane Campbell and William Martin are:

121 i. Thomas Lawrence5 Martin.

122 ii. William Campbell Martin.

123 iii. Eliza Ann Martin.

124 iv. Susannah W. Martin.

125 v. Dabney A. Martin.

126 vi. Charles C. Martin.

127 vii. David Martin.

128 viii. Ellington Walker Martin.

 

42. Anne4 Campbell (William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born Abt. 1780 in Washington County NC. She married William (Major William) Campbell Abt. 1798 in Washington County TN, son of Robert Campbell and Margaret Killpatrick. He was born 17 October 1776 in Montgomery County VA, and died 11 January 1842 in Madison County TN.

Notes for William (Major William) Campbell:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

Major William Campbell was the grandfather of Brigadier General Alexander W. Campbell and the father of John W. Campbell. He was the son of Robert Campbell and his second wife, Margaret Killpatrick. William was probably born in Montgomery County VA in 1776. He and his father's family soon removed to Washington County NC (later part of TN). His father Robert Campbell, settled in the Big Limestone Creek area where he build a grist mill known locally as Campbell's Mill. Williams father, Robert, died in about 1797 and the mill was sold to a close neighbor, George Gilespie. Soon thereafter William removed to Lexington KY where he married Anne Campbell, daughter of his cousin Captain William Campbell (1748-1800). After several years in Lexington, William and his family removed to the town of Greenville in Muhlenberg County KY. In the early 1820's he moved to Nashville where he lived for several years. In about 1828, he was appointed by President Andrew Jackson as the general agent of the Government as receiver of the rents of the mines at Galena, Illinois. After several years in Illinois, William removed to the town of Jackson in Madison County TN where his son John W. Campbell resided. Major William Campbell died in Jackson in 1842.

The following are excerpts from a biography of General Alexander W. Campbell contained in "Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans" (published 1888), compliled by William S. Speer, pages 27-28:

" ... Maj. William Campbell moved from Lexington to the Green River country in Kentucky, and made his home in Greenville [Muhlenberg County], where he established the first bank in that part of the State, of which he made his son [John W. Campbell], then only nineteen years old, the cashier. ... "

" ... Maj. William Campbell was at one time one of the largest pioneer merchants west of the Alleghanies, his business connections extending from the falls of the Ohio to New Orleans and embracing every important business point on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. The business disasters growing out of the great financial crisis of 1817 so impaired his fortunes that he retired from commercial pursuits and accepted the position of superintendent of the mineral lands of the Northwest, tendered him by Gen Jackson who was his intimate personal and political friend, his headquarters being fixed at Galena, Illinois. While residing here the Black Hawk war broke out, and he was elected to command a battalion of volunteers from the state of Illinois. ... "

Children are listed above under (30) William (Major William) Campbell.

43. Charles4 Campbell (William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 28 June 1782 in Washington County NC, and died 09 September 1821 in Muhlenberg County KY. He married Ann ("Nancy") Oates 22 December 1808 in Muhlenberg County KY, daughter of Major Oates and Zilpha Mason. She was born 26 June 1791, and died 09 January 1849.

Children of Charles Campbell and Ann Oates are:

129 i. Lorin Hannah5 Campbell, born 05 October 1809; died 25 November 1832 in Gallatin County IL. She married Thomas Lloyd Posey 13 July 1826 in Gallatin County IL; died 1849 in Gallatin County IL.

130 ii. Elizabeth Jane Campbell, born 29 November 1811. She married Washington Adam Glassell Posey 28 October 1830 in Gallatin County IL; born 1799; died 1843.

131 iii. William Hamilton Campbell, born 02 June 1814; died 1859. He married (1) Phoebe Adams 08 September 1840. He married (2) Evelena Parsons 03 September 1845.

+ 132 iv. John Lloyd Campbell, born 08 October 1816 in Muhlenberg County KY; died 09 October 1875 in Olney IL.

 

48. Martha M.4 Campbell (William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 1798 in Fayette County KY, and died 1841 in Gallatin County IL. She married John Siddall 25 August 1821 in Muhlenberg County KY. He died 1853 in New Orleans LA.

Child of Martha Campbell and John Siddall is:

133 i. James5 Siddall, born 1827 in Gallatin County IL; died 1846 in Gallatin County IL.

 

64. David4 Campbell (David (Colonel David)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 04 March 1781 in Washington County NC, and died 18 June 1841 in Smith County TN. He married Catherine Bowen 15 April 1806 in Sumner County TN, daughter of William Bowen and Mary Russell. She was born 17 March 1785, and died 19 March 1868 in Camp Bell TN.

Children of David Campbell and Catherine Bowen are:

134 i. Mary H. R.5 Campbell. She married E. P. Scales.

+ 135 ii. William (Governor William of TN) Bowen Campbell, born 01 February 1807 in Sumner County TN; died 19 August 1867 in Lebanon (Camp Bell), Wilson County TN.

136 iii. John (Dr. John) Hamilton Campbell, born 21 June 1808; died 16 February 1890.

137 iv. Margaret Hamilton Campbell, born 29 August 1812; died 09 May 1880.

138 v. Virginia Tabitha Jane Campbell, born 1818; died 1867. She married William Shelton.

+ 139 vi. David H. R. Campbell, born 29 June 1826 in Smith County TN; died 21 September 1872 in Wilson County TN.

 

68. Margaret Lavinia4 Campbell (David (Colonel David)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 30 April 1805, and died 29 October 1877. She married Reverend John Kelly 27 January 1833. He was born 28 January 1801, and died 22 May 1864.

Children of Margaret Campbell and Reverend Kelly are:

140 i. Mary5 Kelly.

141 ii. David C. Kelly. He married Mary Owen; born 20 June 1836.

 

97. William4 Campbell (David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 12 November 1793 in Fayette County KY, and died 12 December 1885 in Tulare County CA. He married (1) Sarah McNary 24 September 1816 in Muhlenberg County KY, daughter of William McNary and Ann Campbell. She was born 05 September 1799, and died 16 November 1821 in Muhlenberg County KY. He married (2) Agnes R. Hancock 24 September 1822 in Muhlenberg County KY, daughter of Benjamin Hancock and Priscilla Franklin. She was born 06 September 1800 in Muhlenberg County KY, and died 20 November 1846 in Santa Clara Mission CA. He married (3) Kiziah McKutcheon 05 July 1849 in Santa Clara County CA. He married (4) Louisa Cain 21 July 1857 in Santa Clara County CA. She died 04 March 1898.

Notes for Kiziah McKutcheon:

William Campbell and Keziah McCutcheon were divorced effective 22 January 1855.

Child is listed above under (35) Sarah McNary.

Children of William Campbell and Agnes Hancock are:

+ 142 i. Benjamin5 Campbell, born 16 October 1826 in Muhlenberg County KY; died 26 March 1907 in Santa Clara County CA.

143 ii. Agnes Susan Campbell, born 12 December 1843; died 09 December 1869 in Santa Clara CA. She married William F. Hargis 28 March 1861 in CA.

144 iii. David Campbell, born 23 January 1825; died in Tulare County CA. He married Mary King Whisman 20 September 1849 in Santa Clara County CA; born 1829 in Missouri; died 01 December 1907 in Tulare County CA.

145 iv. Elizabeth Margaret Campbell, born 01 May 1841; died 01 October 1841 in Saline County MO.

146 v. John Franklin Campbell, born 08 November 1839; died 09 October 1878 in Mendocino CA. He married Mary Elizabeth Kindall 09 August 1858 in California; born 18 February 1847; died 13 January 1876 in Sutter City CA.

+ 147 vi. Sarah Mary Campbell, born 22 August 1823; died 28 June 1869 in Kern CA.

148 vii. William G. Campbell, born 13 January 1835. He married Mary J. Hamilton 08 October 1858.

 

98. Jane4 Campbell (David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 19 January 1799 in Fayette County KY, and died 29 August 1861 in Linn County KS. She married David McCord Campbell 25 February 1819 in Muhlenberg County KY, son of James Campbell and Sarah McCord. He was born 05 November 1794 in Madison County KY, and died 05 October 1882 in Linn County KS.

Notes for David McCord Campbell:

1) From "Past and Present of the City of Quincy and Adams County, Illinois" (published 1905), by Hon. William H. Collins and Mr. Cicero F. Perry, page 866:

" ... Captain David M. Campbell, was also a native of Kentucky, born in Madison county in 1794. The grandfather, James Campbell, was of Scotch ancestry and served as a member of the Continental army during the Revolutionary war and afterward became one of the early residents of Kentucky. Captain David Campbell was reared in the state of his nativity and was married there to Miss Jane Campbell, who, though of the same name, belonged to an entirely different family. Captain Campbell was a carpenter by trade and followed that pursuit in Kentucky. While living there he won his title by commanding a company of the state militia, his commission being signed by the governor about 1819. In 1830 he came to Illinois, settling first in Brown county, but in the spring of 1831 he removed to Adams county and opened up a farm. He also conducted a tavern or wayside inn on the old stage road from Quincy to Rushville, Illinois. He afterward built and conducted the first hotel in Clayton, remaining its proprietor for five years, when he sold out and returned to the farm, continuing its cultivation for some time. In the fall of 1860 he removed to Kansas, locating on a farm in Linn County, where he spent his remaining days, his death occurring in 1882 when he had reached the advanced age of nearly eighty-eight years. In his family were five sons and a daughter, all of whom reached adult age. Two sons and a daughter are now living, a brother of our subject [James A. Campbell] being Hon. Charles Campbell of Linn county, Kansas, who follows farming and stockraising there and is one of the prominent and influential men of that locality. A sister, Margaret A., is the wife of W. H. Fish, of Spokane, Washington."

2) From "Quincy and Adams County History and Representative Men" (published 1919), edited by David F. Wilcox, pages 601-602:

"Early Settlers of Clayton Township

"Obediah Hicks is credited with being the pioneer of the township and he settled with his family, in 1829, on the northeast corner of section 23. In April of the following year came David M. Campbell who located on the southeast quarter of section 21 and there his son and other descendents continued to reside for many years. Mr. Campbell was the first teacher in the township, but it is said that he had but "one session a week, and that on Sunday at the houses of the pioneers."

" ... The first death recorded in the township was Sarah J., the infant daughter of David M. Campbell and wife, in August 1832.

" ... David M. Campbell erected the first hotel of the place [Clayton] in the summer of 1835. After keeping the inn for about five years he disposed of it to C. McMurry. In the meantime Mr. Campbell had built a larger two-story structure on the same lot, which he moved to his farm, a mile and a half northwest of town. At that time a deep snow covered the country, and Mr. Campbell, fastening long timbers under the house to serve as runners, collected a battery of nineteen yoke of oxen and gave the word to start the building on its journey. It was an occasion of great excitement and the whole neighborhood turned out to witness the remarkable feat of engineering. It was accomplished without accident, to the accompaniment of the shouts of the chief and amid the excited acclaims of the spectators. The building stood for many years and was long the residence of Samuel Newhouse.

"The transportation of the Campbell building fell in that early period of Clayton's history when its future was not at all bright, and it was not the only structure which was moved from the village to near-by farms, although it was probably the most "sizeable." For several years the town site was almost abandoned, and there was really no revival of substantial life until the railroad came in 1856. ...."

Children of Jane Campbell and David Campbell are:

149 i. Thomas Barr5 Campbell, born 03 April 1820 in Muhlenberg County KY; died 25 April 1869 in Linn County KS. He married Harriet Newell Stewart.

150 ii. David Lee Campbell, born 21 April 1824 in Muhlenberg County KY; died 24 February 1900 in Elk County KS. He married (1) Martha Fruit. He married (2) Elizabeth Rauch.

+ 151 iii. James A. Campbell, born 16 June 1826 in Muhlenberg County KY; died 25 May 1910 in Adams County IL.

152 iv. Edward McCord Campbell, born 16 October 1829 in Muhlenberg County KY; died 08 June 1863 in Linn County KS. He married Martha Jane McHallen 1852 in Adams County IL.

153 v. Sarah Jane Campbell, born 1832 in Adams County IL; died August 1832 in Adams County IL.

154 vi. Charles Campbell, born 14 October 1834 in Adams County IL; died 16 January 1910 in Mapleton KS. He married Isabel Clifton 17 October 1855 in Scott County IL.

155 vii. Margaret Ann Campbell, born Abt. 1836 in Adams County IL. She married (1) Doctor ____ Lyons. She married (2) W. H. Fish.

 

100. Margaret4 Campbell (David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 21 April 1803 in Green County KY, and died 03 September 1872 in Cole County MO. She married Abraham (Reverend Abraham) Norfleet 16 August 1832 in Callaway County MO, son of James Norfleet and Elizabeth _____. He was born 21 January 1802 in Pulaski County KY, and died 03 September 1870 in Cole County MO.

Notes for Abraham (Reverend Abraham) Norfleet:

Abraham was born 21 January 1802 in Pulaski County KY and died in Cole County, Missouri on 03 September 1870. Although his father was living in Russell County, the Pulaski County tax records for 1825 and 1826 indicate that Abraham was living in Pulaski County during those years; he probably was working for his elder brother John and/or his aunt Catherine Norfleet (Widow of David). In June 1825, Abraham was converted to Methodism. Immediately thereafter, he commenced studying for the Methodist ministry and was licensed to preach in 1826.

In 1827 he immigrated to Missouri; he was the first Norfleet to settle in that state. During his first three years in Missouri, he was a Circuit Rider for the Methodist Church. In 1827 he was in the Cape Girardeau area; in 1828, he was on the Saline and St. Francois Circuit. In 1829 he was on the Boonslick Road, near where the town of Old Franklin had once been located. Franklin had been the outfitting point for traders using the Santa Fe Trail during the years 1821-1825. Unfortunately, in the spring of 1826, a flood destroyed the town.

While on the Saline and St. Francois Circuit, the famous Methodist Preacher, Jerome C. Berryman was assigned under him. Berryman, years later, had this to say about Abraham Norfleet:

"He was a poor preacher and a hypochondriac but a devout Christian and a man of much prayer."

In 1830, Abraham was ordained in Saint Louis by Bishop Soule and was located in the Callaway County, Missouri area. To supplement his income as a minister, Reverend Norfleet patented two 40 acre tracts of land in Callaway, which he farmed on a part time basis.

In 1832, Abraham married Margaret Campbell in Callaway County. Margaret was the daughter of David Campbell, who had recently located in Missouri from Muhlenburg County, Kentucky. Abraham and Margaret had three (3) sons and two (2) daughters: John Watson (b. 1833), Adam Campbell (b. 1835), David Campbell (b. 1841), Eliza Jane ((b. 1837) and Ann Hite (b. 1838).

In 1848, Abraham relocated to Cole County, Missouri, acquiring land in the same area where his brother Ivy Norfleet's farm was located. Abraham remained here for the rest of his life. During the Civil War, Reverend Norfleet was a staunch Unionist.

Two of Abraham's sons, John Watson (a sergeant) and Adam Campbell (a private), served with the Union forces, in the 9th Provisional Missouri Regiment of Infantry.

Several of Abraham's descendants continued to be active in the Methodist Episcopal Church. His son John Watson Norfleet (1833-1922) became a licensed Exhorter in the Methodist Church. Abraham's grandson (son of John Watson), Abraham Lincoln Norfleet (1867-1956), became an ordained Methodist minister, in the 1890's.

Children of Margaret Campbell and Abraham Norfleet are:

+ 156 i. John Watson5 Norfleet, born 30 October 1833 in Callaway County MO; died 24 March 1922 in Moniteau County MO.

+ 157 ii. Adam Campbell Norfleet, born 10 June 1835 in Callaway County MO; died 29 September 1901 in Missouri.

158 iii. Ann Hite Norfleet, born 08 November 1838 in Callaway County MO; died 12 February 1901 in Cole County MO. She married Caswell Walser 27 October 1859 in Cole County MO; born 31 December 1825; died 27 February 1908 in Cole County MO.

+ 159 iv. Eliza Jane Norfleet, born 1839 in Callaway County MO.

+ 160 v. David Campbell Norfleet, born 26 May 1841 in Callaway County MO; died 05 December 1920 in Cole County MO.

161 vi. Eliza Jane Norfleet, born 1837.

 

101. James4 Campbell (David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 06 April 1807 in Muhlenberg County KY, and died 29 July 1873 in Salem OR. He married (1) Margaret Almira Finley Abt. 1831 in Callaway County MO. She was born 1813 in Hopkins County KY, and died 28 July 1846 in On Oregon Trail - Greenwood Cutoff. He married (2) Eliza Ayers 1847 in Marion County OR. He married (3) Nancy H. Taylor 09 February 1851 in Saline County MO. She was born 27 September 1811, and died 04 February 1874 in Oregon.

Children of James Campbell and Margaret Finley are:

162 i. Mary5 Campbell, born 1832 in Missouri; died 1846 in On the Oregon Trail.

163 ii. Margaret Ann Campbell, born 1833. She married J. H. Bridges 1848 in Salem OR.

164 iii. Sarah Jane Campbell, born 05 October 1835. She married Wiley Denny.

165 iv. Elizabeth H. Campbell, born 1837. She married Reverend D. M. Keene.

166 v. David Rice Campbell, born 09 September 1839.

167 vi. Dabney Finley Campbell, born 20 December 1841 in Kirkville MO; died 01 March 1921 in Salem OR. He married Martha Baker 23 March 1876 in Turner OR; born 1855 in Turner OR; died 1893 in Marion County OR.

168 vii. Virginia Campbell, born 1843. She married (1) S. J. Condit. She married (2) E. E. McKinney.

Children of James Campbell and Eliza Ayers are:

+ 169 i. Susannah Martin5 Campbell, born 01 January 1848 in Marion County OR; died 19 February 1919 in Woodinville WA.

170 ii. John Campbell, born 1849.

 

102. Thomas4 Campbell (David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 1816 in Kentucky. He married Martha A. West 25 September 1839, daughter of Thomas West and Ann _____. She was born Abt. 1820 in Kentucky.

Notes for Thomas Campbell:

Thomas Campbell (b. 1816) was the youngest brother of William Campbell of Santa Clara CA. In 1831 he relocated to Callaway County, Missouri with his parents. On 25 September 1839 he married Martha West, daughter of Thomas West. Thomas Campbell and his family accompanied William Campbell on the 1846 trek to California.

Child of Thomas Campbell and Martha West is:

171 i. Albert R.5 Campbell, born 1852.

 

104. Cynthia Ann4 Campbell (William (Major William)3, Robert2, Alexander1) was born Abt. 1797 in Fayette County KY, and died Aft. 1883 in Concrete TX. She married (1) Dr. Samuel R. Campbell Abt. 1815, son of William Campbell and Tabitha Russell. He was born Abt. 1789, and died 28 July 1821 in Gallatin County IL. She married (2) George W. McGehee Abt. 1824. He died Aft. 1825. She married (3) John Siddall Aft. 1841 in Gallatin County IL. He died 1853 in New Orleans LA.

Child of Cynthia Campbell and Dr. Campbell is:

172 i. William5 Campbell, born January 1821 in Gallatin County IL; died 29 June 1821 in Gallatin County IL.

Child of Cynthia Campbell and George McGehee is:

173 i. John O.5 McGehee, born Abt. 1825; died Aft. 1883.

 

105. John Williamson4 Campbell (William (Major William)3, Robert2, Alexander1) was born 31 May 1799 in Fayette County KY, and died 30 June 1874 in City of Jackson, Madison County TN. He married (1) Jane Eliza Porter 13 June 1827 in Nashville, Davidson County TN. She was born July 1807 in Davidson County TN, and died 02 December 1849 in City of Jackson, Madison County TN. He married (2) Louisa Allen 27 April 1852 in Madsion County TN. She was born 12 April 1811, and died 25 July 1892 in Madison County TN.

Notes for John Williamson Campbell:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

The following is taken from John W. Campbell's obituary in the "Whig and Tribune" of the town of Jackson, Madison County TN for 4 July 1874:

"Mr. John W. Campbell, one of the oldest amd most distinguished citizens of Jackson, died at his residence in the suburbs of the city on Tuesday last. With his death one of the last links in the golden chain that unites Jackson now, with Jackson past, is severed. His death was sudden and but a few days before the last sad hour, he was well and boastful of his health. He was born on the last day of May, 1799, at Lexington, Kentucky. While an infant, his parents moved to the Green River country and settled at Greenville, Christian County, Ky [Comment: This is an error, Greenville is in Muhlenberg County KY]. He recived his academic education at Hopkinsville. Ky.and graduated at Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania. ... Before he completed his collegiate course his father moved to Nashville, to which place he returned and commenced the study of law. In 1827 he married Miss Jane E. Porter, daughter of the late Alexander porter, one of the earliest citizens of Nashville. By this marriage he had ten children, four of whom still survive him.

"After the Legislature had chartered the Union Bank it was difficult to procure the services of persons of experience as bank officers, and as he, at the early age of nineteen, had been placed in charge of a bank in Kentucky, he was induced to abandon his profession and take charge of the Branch of the Union Bank at Jackson. He arrived in Jackson on the 4th dat of July, 1833, when the bank was organized with the late James Caruthers as President and John W. Campbell as Cashier. His family moved to Jackson in November 1833. In 1843 he attached himself to the Presbyterian Church and soon afterwards was elected one of its elders, a position he continued to hold up to his death. He never took an active part in politics, always preferringthe seculsion of private life and the companionship of his books to the wrangle and strife of a public career, but was always a zealous, unflinching Democrat of the Jeffersonian school. ... "

Children of John Campbell and Jane Porter are:

+ 174 i. Alexander (General Alexander of CSA) W.5 Campbell, born 04 June 1828 in Nashville TN; died 13 June 1893 in Jackson TN.

175 ii. Susan Ann Campbell.

176 iii. Ann Matilda Campbell.

177 iv. Penelope Porter Campbell, died 1872. She married Colonel Robert Sterling.

+ 178 v. Jane Eliza Campbell.

179 vi. Cynthia Roberta Campbell.

180 vii. Mary Madeline Campbell.

181 viii. John James Campbell, born 1843; died 1862 in Battle of Shiloh.

182 ix. Robert Porter Campbell, died 1850.

183 x. Allison Woods Campbell, died 1850.

 

Generation No. 5

119. Margaret Jane5 Campbell (Sarah4 McNary, Ann3 Campbell, Alexander2, Alexander1) was born 01 February 1820, and died 30 September 1852 in Santa Clara County CA. She married James Washington Finley 25 October 1838 in Saline County MO, son of Asa Finley and Name Unknown. He was born 13 October 1813 in Christian County KY, and died 03 May 1865 in Santa Clara County CA.

Children of Margaret Campbell and James Finley are:

184 i. Newton Gleaves6 Finley.

185 ii. William Asa Finley.

186 iii. Sarah Esther Finley.

187 iv. John Pettis Finley.

188 v. Hugh McNary Finley.

189 vi. Ann Eliza Finley.

190 vii. James Benjamin Finley.

 

132. John Lloyd5 Campbell (Charles4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 08 October 1816 in Muhlenberg County KY, and died 09 October 1875 in Olney IL. He married Anne Valeria Guard 14 February 1844 in Gallatin County IL. She was born 13 May 1827, and died 18 February 1893.

Children of John Campbell and Anne Guard are:

191 i. Sarah6 Campbell, born 16 November 1844 in Gallatin County IL; died 25 November 1844 in Gallatin County IL.

192 ii. Charles Allison Campbell, born 05 November 1846 in Gallatin County IL; died Abt. 1902.

193 iii. Challon Guard Campbell, born 30 March 1849 in Gallatin County IL; died 22 August 1910.

194 iv. William Alexander Campbell, born 20 April 1851 in Gallatin County IL; died 1923 in Connell WA.

195 v. John Lloyd Campbell, born 1854 in Gallatin County IL; died 1936 in Pasadena CA.

 

135. William (Governor William of TN) Bowen5 Campbell (David4, David (Colonel David)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 01 February 1807 in Sumner County TN, and died 19 August 1867 in Lebanon (Camp Bell), Wilson County TN. He married Frances Isabella Owen 10 September 1835 in Carthage TN, daughter of John Owen and Mary Goodwin. She was born 05 February 1818 in Carthage TN, and died 22 March 1864 in Lebanon (Camp Bell), Wilson County TN.

Notes for William (Governor William of TN) Bowen Campbell:

[Campbell Family.FTW]

 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF WILLIAM BOWEN CAMPBELL

William Bowen Campbell was the grandson of Colonel David Campbell (1753-1832) of Campbell's Station and the nephew of Governor David Campbell (1779-1859) of Virginia. Governor David Campbell supervised William's education and sent him to the famous law school operated by Henry St. George Tucker at Winchester, Virginia. Subsequently, in 1830, Governor David Campbell furnished William with funds to establish a law practice in Carthage, Tennessee.

In 1835, William Bowen Campbell married Frances Isabella Owen by whom he had ten children; one of whom was Margaret Hamilton Campbell who, in 1911, published the book entitled "Historical Sketches of the Campbell, Pilcher and Kindred Families." For several years, the William Bowen Campbell family lived in Carthage with the Owen family, but in 1842, they moved into their own home, also in Carthage. In 1853, they moved to a small farm on the edge of Lebanon, Tennessee, that he renamed Camp Bell.

Besides pursuing the practice of law, William Bowen Campbell was involved in both political and military activities as follows:

1831-34 Attorney General for the Sparta TN area

1835-36 Member of the TN State Legislature

1836-37 Captain in TN Militia during Creek and Seminole War in Florida

1837-43 U. S. Congressman from TN (Whig)

1844-45 Major General of the TN State Militia

1846-47 Colonel of the 1st TN Regiment of Volunteers in the Mexican War (the "Bloody First," which displayed conspicuous bravery during the Battle of Monterey)

1847-48 Circuit Judge for TN

1851-53 Governor of TN (Whig)

1863 Brigadier General of the Union Army (Civil War)

1865-66 U. S. Congressman from TN

 

In 1853, though he had been a very popular Whig Governor and could have easily won reelection, William Campbell declined to run for a second term. Accordingly, the Democrat Andrew Johnson won the election to succeed Campbell as Governor. Without this electoral success, Johnson would probably never have been selected as a running mate with Abraham Lincoln in the 1864 election.

Throughout the Civil War, William Bowen Campbell supported the Union. He had been a political opponent of Andrew Johnson in TN; however, after the Civil War, while in Congress, Governor Campbell became one of President Johnson's staunchest supporters.

In the election of 1864, Governor Campbell was seriously considered as a vice-presidential candidate on the Democrat ticket with General George B. McClellan, but was unsuccessful due to the opposition of Emerson Etheridge.

I close this sketch with the words of Tennessee historian, Philip M. Hamer. In his book "Tennessee - A History," Mr. Hamer said that William Bowen Campbell:

" was a man in whose integrity and honesty and mental and moral courage even his political enemies had confidence. He was one of those few men in public life who did not seek office but had it thrust upon them."

[The above sketch was prepared by Philip Clark Norfleet in 1997]

Children of William Campbell and Frances Owen are:

196 i. Frances (Fanny) A.6 Campbell.

197 ii. Lemuel Russell Campbell.

198 iii. Mary Owen Campbell. She married D. C. Kelley January 1869.

199 iv. Margaret Hamilton Campbell, born 07 December 1843 in Tennessee; died 26 September 1921 in Wilson County TN. She married James Stuart Pilcher; born 28 October 1840; died 23 July 1934 in Wilson County TN.

200 v. William Bowen Campbell, born 21 July 1846; died 29 May 1869 in Wilson County TN.

201 vi. Joseph Allen Campbell, born 13 July 1853; died 26 September 1939 in Wilson County TN.

202 vii. John (Dr. John) Owen Campbell, born 27 April 1856; died 05 December 1941 in Wilson County TN. He married Susie Towson; born 10 November 1860; died 26 December 1929 in Wilson County TN.

 

139. David H. R.5 Campbell (David4, David (Colonel David)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 29 June 1826 in Smith County TN, and died 21 September 1872 in Wilson County TN. He married Lucy G. Goodall 29 June 1852.

Child of David Campbell and Lucy Goodall is:

203 i. John Owen6 Campbell, born January 1859 in Smith County TN; died 28 March 1926 in Davidson County TN. He married Kate Spiller Findlay 13 February 1881 in White County TN.

 

142. Benjamin5 Campbell (William5, David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 16 October 1826 in Muhlenberg County KY, and died 26 March 1907 in Santa Clara County CA. He married Mary Ellen Louisa Rucker 25 December 1851 in Saline County MO, daughter of William Rucker and Veranda _____. She was born 1834 in Saline County MO, and died 15 March 1913 in Santa Clara County CA.

Children of Benjamin Campbell and Mary Rucker are:

204 i. James Henry6 Campbell. He married (1) Florence George. He married (2) Jesse McKinzie.

205 ii. Laura A. Campbell, born 1854; died 26 July 1895 in Santa Cruz County CA.

206 iii. Lena Malicia Campbell, born 1856 in Santa Clara County CA; died 1930 in Santa Clara County CA. She married Samuel George Rodeck; born 1856; died 1925 in Santa Clara County CA.

 

147. Sarah Mary5 Campbell (William5, David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 22 August 1823, and died 28 June 1869 in Kern CA. She married Asa Wallace Finley 04 November 1841 in Saline County MO, son of Asa Finley and Name Unknown. He was born 03 January 1822 in Saline County MO, and died 04 February 1910 in Merced County CA.

Children of Sarah Campbell and Asa Finley are:

207 i. Elizabeth Esther6 Finley. She married Henry Pascoe.

208 ii. Asa Wallace Finley. He married Fanny Whisman.

209 iii. Louisa Eliza Finley. She married Louis Beardsley.

210 iv. Magaret Ellen Finley. She married Joseph Whisman.

211 v. Mary Finley. She married Joseph Cornwall.

212 vi. Charles Finley. He married Lou _____.

213 vii. Emma Finley. She married J. P. Wilkes.

 

151. James A.5 Campbell (Jane5, David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 16 June 1826 in Muhlenberg County KY, and died 25 May 1910 in Adams County IL. He married Elizabeth Ann Bradney 18 June 1849 in Scott County IL, daughter of Thomas Bradney and Barbara Morris. She was born in Adams County OH.

Notes for James A. Campbell:

1) The following is from "Portrait and Biographical Record of Adams County , Illinois" (published 1892), pages 283-284:

"James Campbell, an enterprising and progressive farmer and stock-raiser residing on section 21, Clayton Township, was born in Kentucky in 1826. ...

" ... In the usual manner of farmer lads, our subject was reared to manhood, and remained under the parental roof until his marriage. In 1849, he was joined in wedlock with Elizabeth A. Bradney, of Brown County. The following year he went to California, where he remained until 1853. While on the Pacific Slope, he was engaged in farming and in merchandising, and he ran the first threshing-machine in the San Jose Valley. On his return, he purchased a tract of land of one hundred and sixteen acres, for which he paid $640, and since that time has engaged in farming and stockraising. In 1872, he built a five-room residence, which has since been replaced by a more commodious dwelling of eight rooms, two stories in height, which was erected at a cost of $2,500. He now has a well-improved farm of three hundred acres and in addition to this, owns two hundred and forty acres in Missouri. His fields are well tilled, and the neat appearance of the place indicates his thrift and enterprise. He also raises fine grades of stock.

"Unto Mr. and Mrs. Cambell have been born the following children: John L., born in 1850, married Mattie Hazlett. T. A., born in 1853, married Lizzie Omer, and after her death wedded Marie Oakes, who died in 1885. He resides in Missouri. Julia, born in 1854, is the wife of John M. Garner of Hancock County. George A., born in 1856, married Jeannie Omer, who resides in Brown County. Allen, born in 1858, married Julia Briggs, and after her death wedded Ollie Wright. He follows farming in Concord Township. Ella, born in 1860, is at home; H. B., born in 1862, is a farmer; James E., born in 1864, is at home; Minnie, born in 1867, is the wife of J. H. Smith, of Clayton;; Ora, born in 1871, completes the famiy

"Mr. Campbell is a member of the Methodist Church, with which he and his wife have been connected for forty years. He has been a Class-leader and Steward for many years, has ever been an earnest worker in the interests of the church, and is one of its members. In politics, he is a Republican, and has held a number of school offices. The cause of Education has found in him a warm friend, and he is a public-spirited and progressive man, ever ready to aid in the advancement of enterprises calculated to promote the general welfare."

2) The following biographical sketch of James Campbell (1826-1910) is taken from "Past and Present of the City of Quincy and Adams County, Illinois" (published in 1905) by William H. Collins and Cicero F. Perry, pages 866-871:

 

"JAMES CAMPBELL

"James Campbell is the oldest resident of Clayton Township. Living a retired life in the village of Clayton, he is now enjoying the rest which has come to him as the result of his activity and energy in former years. For over more than six decades he was one of the enterprising and successful farmers of the county. Few of the residents of this part of the state have so long resided here and his mind bears many pictures of pioneer times and also forms a connecting link with the present. He became a resident of Illinois in 1830, being here at the time of the deep fall of snow in the winter of 1830-31. He is, therefore, numbered among those known as the "snow birds." It was a winter never to be forgotten by any who experienced it, the snow being several feet deep upon the ground for a number of months, so that it was impossible for the settlers to leave their homes.

"Mr. Campbell is a native of Kentucky, his birth having occurred in Muhlenburg County, June 16, 1826. His father, Captain David M. Campbell, was also a native of Kentucky, born in Madison county in 1794. The grandfather, James Campbell, was of Scotch ancestry and served as a member of the Continental army during the Revolutionary war and afterward became one of the early residents of Kentucky. Captain David Campbell was reared in the state of his nativity and was married there to Miss Jane Campbell who, though of the same name, belonged to an entirely different family. Captain Campbell was a carpenter by trade and followed that pursuit in Kentucky. While living there he won his title by commanding a company of the state militia, his commission being signed by the governor about 1819. In 1830 he came to Illinois, settling first in Brown county, but in the spring of 1831 he removed to Adams county and opened up a farm. He also conducted a tavern or wayside inn on the old stage road from Quincy to Rushville, Illinois. He afterward built and conducted the first hotel in Clayton, remaining its proprietor for five years, when he sold out and returned to the farm, continuing its cultivation for some time. In the fall of 1860 he removed to Kansas, locating on a farm in Linn County, where he spent his remaining days, his death occurring in 1882 when he had reached the advanced age of nearly eighty-eight years. In his family were five sons and a daughter, all of whom reached adult age. Two sons and a daughter are now living, a brother of our subject being Hon. Charles Campbell of Linn county, Kansas, who follows farming and stock-raising there and is one of the prominent and influential men of that locality. A sister, Margaret A., is the wife of W. H. Fish, of Spokane. Washington.

"James Campbell was brought to Illinois when a little lad of four years and was reared to manhood in Adams county. He is now the oldest living resident of Clayton Township and in the early days he shared with the family in all of the hardships and trials which come to the pioneer settlers. His educational advantages were extremely limited, owing to the new condition of the country, for the public school system had not been perfected at that time. He is almost entirely self-educated but through experience, observation and reading he gained a good practical knowledge which enabled him to conduct his farming interests with success. He continued to assist in the development and cultivation of the home farm up to the time of his marriage.

"On the 18th of June 1849 in Brown County, Illinois, Mr. Campbell wedded Miss Elizabeth Ann Bradney, who was born in Adams County, Ohio, a daughter of Thomas J. Bradney, who was also a native of that state and was there married to Miss Barbara Morris. Mr. Bradney came to Illinois in 1842, settling in the southern part of the state, where his daughter attended a school in which the mother of William Jennings Bryan was also a student, her name being Lizzie Jennings. Mr. Bradney afterward removed to Brown County.

"Following their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Campbell located in Adams county, where he carried on agricultural pursuits until 1850, when, in company with his brother, he went overland to California, spending two years and two months on the Pacific Coast. There he carried on farming and merchandising in connection with his brother and also operated a threshing machine for one season. He assisted in the building of the first Methodist Episcopal Church in San Jose, California. He returned by way of the Isthmus of Panama to New York City, thence by Niagara Falls and Buffalo and on to Chicago. On again reaching Adams County he bought a farm two and a half miles north of Clayton, comprising one hundred and sixty acres of raw land, which he cleared and improved. He afterward bought more land and now has three hundred and fifty acres in the home place. He erected a large two-story residence, also built a good barn and other outbuildings and through his improvement developed a valuable property. He also bought land in Shelby County, Missouri, having three hundred and forty acres at Honeywell. He has thus made judicious investments in property which returns him a good income. He commenced life at the lowest round of the ladder but has gradually climbed upward. He is today one of the substantial citizens of Clayton township. having a competence that supplies him with all of the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. In Clayton he owns a good home in addition to his farming property and he took up his abode there in April 1900.

"Unto Mr. and Mrs. Campbell have been born eleven children, of whom eight are living: John S. a business man of Wichita. Kansas; T. A. who is living on a farm in Shelby County, Missouri; Julia A. the wife of John M. Garner of Bowen, Illinois; George A. a resident farmer of Clayton township; Allen who also follows farming in that township; Ella the wife of Samuel H. Wallace of Denver. Colorado; Minnie, the wife of J. H. Smith, a farmer of Clayton township; Charles Ora who is living on the old homestead. Three children have passed away: Henry B. married and at his death left six children; James E. married and died at the age of thirty-six years but left no children; and one died in infancy.

"In early life Mr. Campbell gave his political support to the Whig Party and on its dissolution he joined the ranks of the new Republican Party, of which he has since been a stanch advocate. For twenty-five years he served as a member of the school board and the cause of education finds in him a warm and helpful friend, but otherwise he has neither held nor desired office. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he was a member of the building committee at the time of the erection of Grace Methodist Church in Clayton. He has long served as one of its officers and at all times has been helpful in its up building and in the extension of its influence. For seventy-four years he has lived in Adams County and has helped to improve it and make it what it is today. He is indeed one of the honored pioneers of the county who assisted in breaking the virgin soil, in planting the first crops and in carrying forward the work of early development. He may indeed be numbered among those who have laid broad and deep the foundation for the present prosperity of the county. His entire life has been in harmony with manly principles, actuated by honorable purpose and characterized by fair dealing, with his fellowmen. He is today one of the most respected and worthy of the pioneer settlers of Adams County."

Children of James Campbell and Elizabeth Bradney are:

214 i. John S.6 Campbell, born 1850.

215 ii. T. A. Campbell, born 1853.

216 iii. Julia A. Campbell, born 1854.

217 iv. George A. Campbell, born 1856.

218 v. Allen Campbell, born 1858.

219 vi. Ella Campbell, born 1860.

220 vii. Minnie Campbell, born 1867.

221 viii. Charles Ora Campbell, born 1871.

222 ix. Henry B. Campbell.

223 x. James E. Campbell.

 

156. John Watson5 Norfleet (Margaret5 Campbell, David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 30 October 1833 in Callaway County MO, and died 24 March 1922 in Moniteau County MO. He married (1) Sarah Catherine Nichols 04 August 1864 in Cole County MO, daughter of John Nichols and Julia Lewis. She was born 02 April 1847 in Boone County MO, and died 24 April 1882 in Moniteau County MO. He married (2) Mary Jane Kupe 01 March 1883. She was born 1835, and died 1924.

Notes for John Watson Norfleet:

Obituary of John Watson Norfleet (1833-1922)

The following is a transcript of the obituary of John Watson Norfleet (1833-1922) that appeared in the Moniteau County, Missouri Herald on Thursday, March 30, 1922:

"A CIVIL WAR VETERAN DEAD

"J. W. Norfleet One of the First Settlers of High Point Attains Age of Over Eighty Eight

"John W Norfleet was born October 31, 1833, departed this life peacefully and quietly on March 24, 1922, age 88 years 4 months and 24 days. He was the son of Abram Lincoln Norfleet and Margaret Campbell Norfleet and the eldest of five the children each of whom have preceded him to their future home. He was born in Callaway county, Mo., where he spent his boyhood days. At the age of 18 he moved with his parents to hickory Hill, Cole county, Mo., where he engaged in farming at the family homestead and spent his young manhood until the outbreak of the civil war in 1861. At the call of Lincoln for volunteers to serve in the Union cause he enlisted as a volunteer, serving with Co. N., 9th Mo. Regiment, Infantry, being mustered out at the close of the war with an honorable discharge. In this three years service in common with all Civil War soldiers, hardships and serious times endured. He did guard duty for the State Capitol at Jefferson City during Prices Raid through Missouri and rendered other valuable service with his regiment. In 1864 he was united in marriage with Sarah Catherine Nichols of Callaway county, Missouri. Soon after this [in] 1865 they settled in south end of Moniteau county on the land where he has made his home, raised his family, and lived until departure for his eternal home. To this union was born five children, all still living viz: Viola Isabelle Reno of Fulton, Mo.; Abraham of Danville, Ill.; Robert A. of Excelsior, Mo.; Rosalie Ann Howe, Champaign, Ill.; and Sarah Catherine Donaldson of Lincoln, Ill. There are four grand children and five great great grand children. One of the severest trials of this early family and home life was during the spring of 1882 when the smallpox scourge took a large number from this community. Fathers wife, and mother of his children falling a victim which left him a widower on April 24, 1882. March 1st, 1883, father was married a second time to Mrs. Mary Jane Kupe whose home was an adjoining farm. This marriage adding her three children to the home making 8 children in all. Two of these Fred and Nellie Kupe are deceased.

"The oldest, Frank with his widowed mother survive and with the children are today mourners in these ceremonies.

"The father of our subject being a pioneer Methodist minister. His son was raised and trained after the discipline and religion of the Methodist teaching. He therefore dedicated his heart and life to God at an early age - uniting with the Methodist church and in mature years became a licensed exhorter and local preacher which he maintained during his active life. In 1867 he and his co-laborers began the erection of the once famous High Point Methodist church which was completed and dedicated in1868. His ox teams hauling the framing timbers from the saw mill. This being the first Methodist Episcopal church dedicated in Missouri after the close of the civil war. His home was always a home for the itinerant minister of the early days. The early presiding elders were conducted around to the I. C. meetings in his conveyance, His home was a religious home from the start. In his children's growing days, the hack or buggies were hitched up every Sunday morning and all were off to Sunday School and church. Family prayer was a daily custom while raising his family. He was happiest when taking part in a spirited religious service. He was called on frequently not only by Methodist preachers to pray exhort in public services at close of a sermon, but also by Presbyterians, Baptists and others to which he always responded and many revivals in early days credited their success from his fervent exhortations to sinners. Father Norfleet was a Aid-de-Camp member of the Grand Army of the republic, Department of Mo. Post No. 135 Olean.

"As an American patriot none exceeded him in loyalty to the flag and zeal for the perpetuity of the fundamental principles of liberty, freedom and justice of the American Republic. In his later years he has become known far and wide as uncle John. In his last years of dependence and decrepitude, his wife has been ably assisted by Uncle Tom and Mrs. Hattie Medlin in making his ripe old age as peaceful and happy as possible. Death was but the closing of his eyes in a eternal sleep. 'He is not for God took him.' "

Children of John Norfleet and Sarah Nichols are:

224 i. Robert Arthur6 Norfleet, born 05 January 1869 in Moniteau County MO; died 05 January 1933 in Morgan County MO. He married Minnie A. Tising 1897 in Moniteau County MO; born 1868; died 23 July 1946 in Morgan County MO.

Notes for Robert Arthur Norfleet:

The following is an excerpt from "A History of Morgan County and Some of Its People," by A. G. Baker (published 1907-1917), pages 96-97:

"ROBERT AUTHUR NORFLEET

"Mr. Norfleet and his wife live in Excelsior, this county. Mr. Norfleet is a merchant there in a firm styled Tising & Norfleet. Mr. Norfleet was born January 5, 1870, at High point, Moniteau county, Missouri. His father was John W. Norfleet, born Cole county about 1829, and his mother's maiden name was Sarah C. Nichols, born in Callaway county about 1842. Mr. Norfleet came to Morgan county March 15, 1897, from High point. His parents never lived in Morgan county. His father is still living at High Point; his mother died at High point in 1881, in April. He has one brother and three sisters, all living. His father was a farmer and never held office of any kind. R. A. Norfleet was educated in the public schools and in the Missouri State University at Columbia. he is a member of Versailles lodge I. O. O. F. His wife's maiden name was Minnie A. Tising and she was raised at High Point.

"For a year or so after coming to Morgan county Mr. Norfleet was justice of the peace and in 1904 he was elected representative of Morgan county. The Republican convention of that year nominated M. S. Evans, now of Topeka, Kansas, for representative but in a few weeks after the nomination was made it as discovered that for some reason Mr. Evans could not hold the office should he be elected. He withdrew and the Republican county central committee very wisely put Mr. Norfleet on the head of the ticket. Although Mr. Norfleet had but six weeks in which to make a campaign he made every hour count and left no stone unturned and he defeated his Democratic opponent, Mr. John A. Hannay, by a good majority.

"Mr. Norfleet made a good and influential representative. He was given second place on the committee of Appropriations. He took an active part in financial matters of state and was regarded as a safe and useful man in the legislature. He was re-elected in 1906 over D. E. Wray and given first place on Appropriations and Accounts committee as minority member. He was active in causing the building of the new hospital in the state prison. He worked hard to have the Missouri supreme court building built of Missouri stone, which was not done. In 1906 he was appointed by Governor Folk as the Republican member of the Junketing committee which has to visit and inspect all of the state institutions and make their report to the legislature. He received much applause for the good work he did on this committee. Mr. Norfleet is the present member of the legislature for Morgan county."

Notes for Minnie A. Tising:

Minnie Tising Norfleet was quite well known to my family. My father (Clark Wesley Norfleet) always called her Aunt Minnie. She published a book in 1917 entitled "Whirl Around the World" that told the story of her trip around the world in 1913 taken on the German-Amerika luxury liner THE PRESIDENT CLEVELAND. I have a photocopy of the book and may digitize and publish it on the Net some day.

The literary quality is not very high but the book is still worth reading as it portrays the world as it was during the last Indian Summer of Western Civilization, when people of European ancestry still ruled the world. Only one year later, Europe entered into the first of two horrible civil wars (1914-1918 and 1939-1945) that utterly destroyed European world hegemony. Minnie's trip was essentially a series of seaborne visits to various major ports around the world - almost all the places visited were then outposts of the British Empire!

 

225 ii. Viola Isabella Norfleet. She married _____ Reno.

226 iii. Rosalie Ann Norfleet. She married _____ Howe.

227 iv. Sarah Catherine (Sallie) Norfleet. She married _____ Donaldson.

228 v. Reverend Abraham Lincoln Norfleet, born 14 July 1867 in Moniteau County MO; died 11 April 1956 in Santa Clara County CA. He married Louella Belle Mayfield 28 June 1894 in Leclede County MO; born 08 February 1871 in LaClede County MO; died 19 October 1909 in Edgar County IL.

Notes for Reverend Abraham Lincoln Norfleet:

 

 

Notes for Louella Belle Mayfield:

OBITUARY OF LOUELLA BELLE MAYFIELD

The following obituary for Louella Belle Mayfield Norfleet is taken from a newspaper clipping in my possession. The article appeared in the Edgar County, Illinois newspaper, The Beacon, and is dated 19 October 1909:

"Edgar, Oct. 19. - The citizens of this community were shocked to learn of the untimely death of Mrs. A. L. Norfleet, wife of the local M. E. minister, who was found dead in her bed at about 6 o'clock this morning, death being due to heart failure. She had been complaining for some time and was attended by a physician, it being therefore unnecessary to call the coroner. Mrs. Norfleet had been sleeping by herself and was found by her husband, who had arisen about the hour above mentioned. From the condition of her body, it is believed she had been dead about fifteen minutes.

"Louella Mayfield, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Mayfield, was born in Lebanon, Mo., 1870, being therefore aged 39 years. She spent her entire childhood at Lebanon and was there married, in 1894, to Rev. A. L. Norfleet, who survives her. There were three children born to them, all of whom are living, as follows: Evalyn, Robert and Clark. Besides her bereaved husband and children, the deceased is survived by four brothers, residing at Lebanon, and her father, her mother having passed away quite recently.

"After Mr. and Mrs. Mayfield were married, they lived at various places in pursuance of Mr. Norfleet's duties as a pastor of the M. E. church. They came here about one year ago, and in that short space of time have built up a large congregation, in the local church and have won for themselves many staunch friends.

"Short funeral services will be conducted from the family residence this evening, Rev. Dr. S. H. Whitlock, of Danville, being in charge. From here the remains will be transported to Lebanon where final services will be held and interment made."

 

157. Adam Campbell5 Norfleet (Margaret5 Campbell, David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 10 June 1835 in Callaway County MO, and died 29 September 1901 in Missouri. He married Martha J. Farmer 13 August 1868 in Cole County MO. She was born 15 November 1851 in Missouri, and died 09 April 1927 in Missouri.

Children of Adam Norfleet and Martha Farmer are:

229 i. William D.6 Norfleet, born 1870.

230 ii. Schuyler Colfax Norfleet, born 04 February 1871; died 26 January 1933. He married Ethel Ann Henley; born 02 November 1875; died 16 January 1944.

231 iii. Charles W. Norfleet, born 1872.

232 iv. E. A. Norfleet, born 1877.

 

159. Eliza Jane5 Norfleet (Margaret5 Campbell, David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 1839 in Callaway County MO. She married John D. Hite 1868 in Miller County MO.

Children of Eliza Norfleet and John Hite are:

233 i. John William6 Hite.

234 ii. James Monroe Hite.

235 iii. Mary Ann Hite.

236 iv. Louis S. Hite.

 

160. David Campbell5 Norfleet (Margaret5 Campbell, David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 26 May 1841 in Callaway County MO, and died 05 December 1920 in Cole County MO. He married Mary E. Farmer 03 March 1866 in Cole County MO, daughter of William Farmer and Name Unknown. She was born 03 November 1845 in MO, and died 07 January 1898 in Cole County MO.

Children of David Norfleet and Mary Farmer are:

237 i. John W.6 Norfleet, born 1867.

238 ii. Abraham C. Norfleet, born 1868; died 1939. He married Cornella _____; born 1868; died 1960.

239 iii. Caswell Norfleet, born 15 April 1871 in Cole County MO; died 1911 in Cole County MO.

240 iv. Samuel D. Norfleet, born 1872.

241 v. George Washington Norfleet, born 05 November 1873 in Missouri; died 25 January 1925 in Colorado Springs CO. He married Anna Belle Miller 22 September 1906 in Miller County MO; born 02 March 1886 in Missouri; died 01 January 1954 in Missouri.

242 vi. James M. Norfleet, born 10 September 1875 in Missouri; died 27 July 1899 in Cole County MO.

243 vii. Elvas Eugene Norfleet, born 1878; died 1968. He married Sally F. _____; born 1880; died 1954.

 

169. Susannah Martin5 Campbell (James5, David4, William (Captain William)3, David (Black David)2, Alexander1) was born 01 January 1848 in Marion County OR, and died 19 February 1919 in Woodinville WA. She married Ira R. Woodin 01 January 1863. He was born 01 May 1833, and died 20 November 1908 in Woodinville WA.

Children of Susannah Campbell and Ira Woodin are:

244 i. Helen6 Woodin.

245 ii. Mary Woodin.

246 iii. Frank Woodin.

 

174. Alexander (General Alexander of CSA) W.5 Campbell (John Williamson4, William (Major William)3, Robert2, Alexander1) was born 04 June 1828 in Nashville TN, and died 13 June 1893 in Jackson TN. He married Ann Dixon Allen 13 January 1852 in Lebanon TN, daughter of Dixon Allen. She died Aft. 1888 in Jackson TN.

Notes for Alexander (General Alexander of CSA) W. Campbell:

 

The following is a quotation from "Historic Madison - The Story of Jackson and Madison County Tennessee" by Emma Inman Williams (published 1946), pages 184-186:

"Another illustrious son of Madison County was general Alexander W. Campbell, the son of Jackson's first banker, John W. Campbell. General Campbell was born in Nashville, June 4, 1828 and came to Jackson with his family in 1833, at which place he attended the Jackson Male Academy and West Tennessee College. After reading law for over for over a year under Judge A. W. O. Totten, he entered the department of law of Cumberland University from which institution he graduated in 1852. He practiced law in jackson until the outbreak of the Civil War. From 1854-1860 he served as United States District Attorney from the Western District of Tennessee. He was a Democrat of the Jeffersonian school, so he did not hesitate as to which side he should taken [sic] when hostilities began. When the call came for volunteers to repel the invasion of the South, he enrolled himself as a private in the "Independent Guards," which became a part of the Sixth Tennessee, but he was soon appointed Assistant Inspector General in the provisional army. After serving five months on General Cheatham's staff, he was elected colonel of the Thirty-Third Tennessee and distinguished himself leading his regiment at Shiloh on the 6th and 7th of April 1862. During the battle he was shot in the arm, injured in the foot, and had his horse shot from under him, but he did not leave the field until his gallant regiment left and then he was among the last to leave.

"General Campbell fought in the battle of Perryville and of Murfreesboro. In 1863, he was sent to West tennessee by general bragg to recruit cavalrymen but while he was here he was captured and taken a prisoner of war to Johnson's Island where he remained for a year before he was exchanged. General Campbell served the remainder of the war as commander of one of Forrest's brigrades.

"After the Civil War, General Campbell resumed his practice of law in jackson in partnership with Judge Totten, H. W. McCorry, Howell E. Jackson, John L. Brown, respectively. He had a large and lucrative practice but he spent his money freely. His motto being: Be honest, do your duty, and let the consequences care of themselves.

"The people of the community had great confidence in general campbell. he was elected mayor in 1856; was president of the Bank of madison from 1866-1881; was a director of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad from 1868-1872; was a delegate from Tennessee to the National Democratic Convention in 1868 and 1876; was a delegate from Madison County to the State Constitutional Convention in 1870, serving on the judiciary committee. On several occasions he served as special judge of the bench of the state.

"Thus as a lawyer, a banker, a planter, a Democrat, a mayor, a general, and a far-sighted citizen, Alexander campbell occupied the place of one of the outstanding leaders of the community during the last half of the nineteenth century."

Children of Alexander Campbell and Ann Allen are:

247 i. Dixon Allon6 Campbell.

248 ii. Louisa Jane Campbell, died 1877.

249 iii. Anne Allen Campbell.

250 iv. John W. Campbell, born 02 June 1866.

251 v. Katherine Fenner Campbell.

252 vi. Alexander W. Campbell.

 

178. Jane Eliza5 Campbell (John Williamson4, William (Major William)3, Robert2, Alexander1) She married Dr. Preston B. Scott.

Children of Jane Campbell and Dr. Scott are:

253 i. Jane Porter6 Scott. She married Frank L. Woodruff.

254 ii. Campbell Scott.

255 iii. Ramsey Scott. He married _____ Jefferson.