Make your own free website on Tripod.com

    

 

Campbells of Southwest Virginia

Home Biographies Essays Memoirs Personal Letters Wills

 

Five Generation Genealogical Report -- "White David" Branch of Campbell Family

By Phil Norfleet

 

Generation No. 1

1. John6 Campbell (Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 16 November 1674 in Ulster Province, Ireland, and died 1741 in Beverley Manor VA. He married Grace (Grissell) Hay 1695, daughter of Patrick Hay and Name Unknown. She was born 1677, and died 1770 in Augusta County VA.

Notes for John Campbell:

THE ANCESTORS OF JOHN CAMPBELL -- FATHER OF "WHITE DAVID"

I have no documentary evidence which substantiates the existence of any of the early generations of Campbells prior to John Campbell (d. 1741), husband of Grace Hay. Hence, mention of these early Campbells should be carefully qualified. The early generations of Campbells shown in this genealogical report are those cited by Governor David Campbell in a note I found among his papers (see below).

NOTE OF GOVERNOR DAVID CAMPBELL OF VA

Governor David Campbell (1779-1859) of VA was a meticulous researcher and it is mainly due to his work that the story of John Campbell and Grace Hay (parents of White David) and their descendants has survived. Governor Campbell's papers and other documents are part of the Campbell Papers Collection (about 8,000 documents) located at Duke University, Durham NC. A microfilm copy of the Campbell Papers is located at the Tennessee State Library and Archives in Nashville. In 1996, while reviewing this microfilm copy, I found the following note, in Governor David Campbell's handwriting, on microfilm reel number 1 (my comments are in brackets):

"Genealogy - The Campbell Family

"The farthest back the Campbell family can be traced is to Duncan Campbell of Inverary, Scotland, the place where the old Duke of Argyle and most of the Scotch [sic] Campbells lived. It was in the latter part of Queen Elizabeth's reign that Duncan Campbell moved from Inverary to Ireland. Not long afterwards, in the reign of James First, when he had come to the throne, forfeitures were declared at Ulster in 1612, and Duncan Campbell bought a lease of the forfeited land from one of the English officers. One of his sons, Patrick, bought out the lease and estate in remainder, whereby he acquired the [land in] fee simple. How many other sons Duncan may have had is not known.

"Patrick had a son Hugh, and he a son Andrew. The generations from Andrew to our great-grandfather John [husband of Grace Hay] are not stated. It should be to Duncan, father of John Campbell, [who] emigrated to America with his family in the year 1726 and settled in the Sweet Ara river where Lancaster now stands in Pennsylvania. He [meaning John Campbell, husband of Grace Hay] had six sons, Patrick, John, William, James, Robert and David. Three - to wit - John, William and James were never married. John died in in England having gone there with Lord Boyne and became [his] steward."

LETTER OF GOVERNOR DAVID CAMPBELL TO LYMAN DRAPER

Governor David Campbell (1779-1859), in a letter to Lyman Draper, dated 12 Dec 1840, had this to say concerning the origin of his branch (White David's) of the Campbell Clan in America (my comments are in brackets):

" ... The Campbell family from which I am descended were originally from Inverary in the Highlands of Scotland - came to Ireland in the latter part of the reign of Queen Elizabeth & thence to America. John Campbell [husband of Grace Hay] my great grandfather and the great grandfather of Gen'l William Campbell of the Revolution came from Ireland with a family of ten or twelve children, leaving behind him only one son, and settled near Lancaster in Pennsylvania in the year 1726. His eldest son Patrick was the grandfather of Gen'l William Campbell. His youngest son David [White David] was the father of Col Arthur Campbell and my grandfather. So that Gen'l Campbell and myself were second cousins. The family remained in Pennsylvania but a few years and then removed to the frontiers of Virginia, in that part which afterwards formed the county of Augusta. Here they lived many years. John Campbell (my father) the eldest son of David and Col Arthur Campbell the second son were born, raised and educated in this county. Gen'l William Campbell was also born, raised and educated here. ..." [see Draper Manuscripts, Kings Mountain Papers, 10DD6, pages 1 and 2.]

From my own research, I can place these Campbells in Beverley Manor by 1738 - in that year Patrick Campbell acquired 1546 acres of land in the Manor. John Campbell (husband of Grace Hay) died in about 1741 as his estate was appraised/inventoried in that year. In summary, based on my own research among the records of Orange and Augusta Counties VA, Governor David Campbell's story of the origins of his family in America appear to be entirely reasonable.

E-MAIL MESSAGE OF DIARMID CAMPBELL RE ANCESTORS OF JOHN CAMPBELL

Date: 01 January 1998

" ... although a number of people have attempted research in Ireland absolutely no further information has appeared about the ancestry of Duncan Campbell who married Mary McCoy.

"Pilcher states quite clearly at one point in her book that her information on those earlier (likely fictitious generations going back to Inverary) were taken by her from an elderly relation who thought she remembered that information. Pilcher had not intended to publish her book and it might have been better had she not, since the misinformation has misled so many and God knows how many family histories have now been published giving her bogus material as their source. Her later material appears to be more sound, although since she often gives no sources or references (as to where material was found), it means that anyone of the descents of those whom she outlines has to re-do the research.

"I have also thought that there might be some connection between the Drumaboden and the 18th century Virginia Campbells. But none has as yet appeared. Two professional research efforts in Ireland have so far been conducted, one just completed and the other in the '80s. These were conducted by getting a group of descendants to put up some funds each and were co-ordinated through the Genealogists of the Clan Campbell Society of the time. While both were helpful in clarifying where no information could be found (so making easier any future research efforts), neither produced any clarification on the ancestry of either family going back from Ireland to Scotland.

"If you want the results of the second research effort you could write to the Society Genealogist, Dr.Ruby G. Campbell PhD, 3310 Fairway Drive, Baton Rouge LA 70809 USA, and ask her to let you know what to send her for the photocopying and mailing costs. But the information is not, I seem to remember, directly concerned with Drumaboden. ...

" ... There are in fact three sets of Northern Irish Campbells who may or may not be connected: Drumaboden, Duncan and his cousin Dugald Campbell, and the 18th century Virginia Campbells descended from one John Campbell who came over to Pennsylvania at a fairly advanced age in the 1720s or 30s."

Notes for Grace (Grissell) Hay:

Margaret Campbell Pilcher, in her book entitled "Historical Sketches of the Campbell, Pilcher and Kindred Families" (published 1911), at page 11 says the following:

" ... John Campbell, son of Duncan Campbell and Mary McCoy, his wife, married Grissell (or Grace) Hay, daughter of Patrick Hay, in the year 1695. She lived to be ninety-three years of age. ... John Campbell and his wife, Grissell Hay, with their children, moved from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania about 1730, to Fincastle County, Virginia. ... "

The last statement of the above quotation is in error. While Lancaster County PA was formed in 1729, Fincastle County VA was not formed until 1772. The land records of Orange County VA indicate that John Campbell, and at least three of his sons (Patrick, Robert and David), had removed to Beverley Manor by 1738 or perhaps a year or two earlier. Upon the full activation of the Augusta County VA Courthouse in December 1745, the subsequent records pertaining to these Campbell inhabitants of Beverley Manor are found in Augusta County.]

The name "Grace" comes from the Latin and means "graceful" or "lovely." In French the name is rendered as "Grazielle." In Scotland the name is frequently rendered as "Grissell," a variation on the French pronounciation and spelling.

In my research among the 18th century records of Orange and Augusta County VA, I have never seen the name "Grace (or Grissell) Campbell" or "Grace Hay" appear. Accordingly, I am unable to provide any documentary verification as to Grace Hay's existence as the wife of John Campbell (d. 1741).

Children of John Campbell and Grace Hay are:

              + 2 i. David (White David)7 Campbell, born 08 March 1705/06 in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland; died 19 October 1790 in Washington County VA.

              + 3 ii. Patrick Campbell, born Abt. 1696; died 1767.

              4 iii. Robert Campbell, born Abt. 1695; died 1768 in Augusta County VA. He married Never Married.

              5 iv. John Campbell, died in England.

              6 v. William Campbell, died in PA Colony. He married Never Married.

              7 vi. James Campbell, died in Ireland. He married Never Married.

              8 vii. Catherine Campbell.

              9 viii. Mary Campbell.

               

Generation No. 2

2. David (White David)7 Campbell (John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 08 March 1705/06 in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland, and died 19 October 1790 in Washington County VA. He married Mary Hamilton 16 January 1734/35 in Pennsylvania Colony, daughter of Arthur Hamilton and Martha Conyngham. She was born Abt. 1716 in Londonderry County, Ulster Province, Ireland, and died 1801 in Washington County VA.

Children of David Campbell and Mary Hamilton are:

              + 10 i. John8 Campbell, born 20 April 1742 in Augusta County VA; died 17 December 1825 in Washington County VA.

              + 11 ii. Arthur (Colonel Arthur) Campbell, born 03 November 1743 in Augusta County VA; died 08 August 1811 in Knox County KY.

              + 12 iii. Margaret Campbell, born 31 March 1748 in Augusta County VA; died 29 July 1799 in Knox County TN.

              + 13 iv. David (Judge David) Campbell, born 1750 in Augusta County VA; died 21 November 1812 in Rhea County TN.

              + 14 v. Robert Campbell, born May 1755 in Augusta County VA; died 25 December 1831.

              15 vi. Patrick Campbell, born 1757; died Abt. 1837 in Williamson County TN. He married Martha Long 03 April 1798 in Washington County VA.

               

3. Patrick7 Campbell (John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born Abt. 1696, and died 1767. He married Delilah Thompson.

Children of Patrick Campbell and Delilah Thompson are:

              + 16 i. Charles8 Campbell, died 1767.

              17 ii. James Campbell.

              18 iii. William Campbell.

              + 19 iv. Patrick Campbell, died 1799 in Muhlenberg County KY.

               

Generation No. 3

10. John8 Campbell (David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 20 April 1742 in Augusta County VA, and died 17 December 1825 in Washington County VA. He married Elizabeth McDonald 10 June 1778 in Botetourt County VA, daughter of Edward McDonald and Elizabeth Robinson. She was born 29 May 1753, and died 10 July 1827 in Washington County VA.

Notes for John Campbell:

The following sketch of John Campbell is found at pages 791-792 of the book "History of Southwest Virginia" (published 1903), by Lewis Preston Summers:

"JOHN CAMPBELL

"The subject of this sketch was the son of David Campbell [Comment: This man is known in Campbell genealogical literature as White David], and was born in Augusta county. In about the year 1765 he accompanied Dr. Thomas Walker to the waters of the Holston, and with his father and brothers purchased a valuable tract of land on the waters of the Middle Fork of Holston river called the "Royal Oak," now about one mile east of Marion, Virginia. He was acaptain of militia and took part in the battle of Long Island Flats. He was a member of the County Court of Washington county, became clerk of the court of the county in the year 1779, and served until 1815, thirty-six years. About the beginning of the nineteenth century he purchased from Jacob Young a valuable tract of land in the lower end of this county [Washington], since known as "Halls Bottom." This Jacob Young came directly from Germany with a large household; was a wealthy man, and lived and ruled his household and tenantry like a lord. To this tract of land John Campbell removed and lived for many years, reared a large family of children, many of whom became distinguished. John Campbell, his son, was for ten years treasurer of the United States, and represented this county in the Legislature before he was twenty-one years of age. David Campbell, his son, was for twenty-two years clerk of the County Court of this county, member of the Senate of Virginia for four years, and Governor of Virginia from 1837-1841. A grandson, Wm. B. Campbell, was Governor of Tennessee [Comment: This statement is in error; William Bowan Campbell was John Campbell's grand-nephew], and a brother-in-law, Archibald Roane, the husband of Ann Campbell, was judge of the Supreme Court of the State of Tennessee and Governor of that State from 1801 to 1804. Another son, Edward Campbell, was a distinguished lawyer, and lived in this county."

WILL OF JOHN CAMPBELL

John Campbell's will, dated 28 October 1821, was witnessed by son David Campbell and his son's wife, Mary Hamilton Campbell. Sons David and Edward Campbell were named as executors. The will was proved in Washington County VA Court on 20 March 1828 by oath of David Campbell and on 22 August 1828 by the oath of Mary H. Campbell, the other subscribing witness. The will mentions, by name, only his wife Elizabeth, daughters Elizabeth and Mary, and sons Edward and David.

Children of John Campbell and Elizabeth McDonald are:

              20 i. David (Governor David of VA)9 Campbell, born 07 August 1779 in Washington County VA; died 19 March 1859 in Washington County VA. He married Mary Hamilton Campbell 1799 in Knox County TN; born 22 February 1783; died 06 October 1859 in Washington County VA.

              Notes for David (Governor David of VA) Campbell:

              The following sketch of Governor David Campbell is found at pages 766-767 of the book "History of Southwest Virginia" (published 1903), by Lewis Preston Summers:

              "DAVID CAMPBELL

              "The subject of this sketch was the eldest son of John Campbell and Elizabeth McDonald, his wife, of Hall's Bottom, Washington County, Virginia, and was born on the 2d of August, 1779, at Royal Oak (now in Smyth county), and was about eight years old when his father removed to Hall's Bottom. There he grew up, receiving such education as the frontier settlements could provide. In the year 1794, in his fifteenth year, he was appointed an Ensign in Captain John Davis's company of militia. In 1799 he was commissioned a captain of a company of light infantry assigned to the Seventieth Regiment of Militia, and in the fall of the same year he married his cousin, Mary Hamilton [Comment: Mary was the daughter of Colonel David Campbell of Campbell's Station, Tennessee]. He studied law, and was licensed, but never practiced his profession. In 1802 he was appointed deputy clerk of the County Court of Washington county, and chiefly discharged the duties of the office to the year 1812. On the 6th of July, 1812, he was commissioned a major in the Twelfth Regiment of Infantry, United States army, and marched with the forces to the lakes of Canada, where he served under Generals Alexander Smyth and Van Rensselaer. On the 12th of March, 1813, he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the Thirtieth Regiment, where he served until the year 1814, when he resigned his commission. Upon his return home he entered the service of Virginia as aide-de-camp to Governor Barbour, and gave valuable assistance to organizing the large military forces called into service in the summer of 1814. In the year 1815 he was elected by the General Assembly as general of the Third Brigade of the Virginia Militia. On the 25th of January, 1815 he was appointed colonel of the Third Virginia Cavalry, and was afterward transferred to the Fifth Regiment of Cavalry. Upon his return to Abingdon, he entered the clerk's office, where he remained until 1820, when he was elected a member of the State Senate from the Abingdon district for the term of four years. In 1824 he was elected clerk of the County Court of Washington county, which position he occupied until he took his seat as Governor of Virginia, on the 31st of March, 1837. Governor Campbell, at the time of his election, was a Jacksonian Democrat, but while Governor, and during the administration of President Van Buren, the sub-treasury scheme and the standing army bill, as they were commonly called, were made party measures, and being opposed to them, he warmly supported General Harrison in the presidential campaign of 1840, and ever after acted with the Whig party. Governor Campbell, in his first message to the General Assembly, proposed the establishment of the common school system, of which he was one of the earliest advocates. Upon his retirement from the position of Governor of the Commonwealth, he was commissioned a justice of the peace for Washington county, and was diligent in the discharge of his duties as such until the year 1852, when he returned to private life, after having spent nearly one-half a century in the public service. In person Governor Campbell was about five feet eleven inches in height, spare and erect in carriage, with dark hair and eyes and intellectual countenance and pleasing manners. He died at "Mont Calm," his home, now the home of Colonel Cummings, on March 19th, 1859, without issue, and his remains were interred in Sinking Spring Cemetery, Abingdon, Virginia."

              WILL OF GOVERNOR DAVID CAMPBELL

              David Campbell's will, dated 4 February 1857, with codicil dated 7 September 1857, was probated in Washington County VA on 29 March 1859. [See Washington County VA, Will Book 14, pages 402-407.]

              + 21 ii. Edward Campbell, born 1781 in Washington County VA; died 1833 in Washington County VA.

              + 22 iii. Mary Campbell, born 1783 in VA Colony; died 15 October 1829 in Washington County VA.

              23 iv. Catherine Campbell, born Abt. 1785.

              24 v. Eliza Campbell, born Abt. 1787.

              25 vi. John (Treasurer of United States) Campbell, born Abt. 1789 in Washington County VA; died Abt. 1866 in Smyth County VA.

              Notes for John (Treasurer of United States) Campbell:

              The following sketch of John Campbell is found at pages 792-793 of the book "History of Southwest Virginia" (published 1903), by Lewis Preston Summers:

              "COLONEL JOHN CAMPBELL

              "The subject of this sketch was the son of John Campbell [of Hall's Bottom], and was born at Royal Oak in about the year 1791 [Comment: My estimate is that he was born in 1789]. He was educated at the Abingdon Academy, and in the year 1811 was elected a member of the House of Delegates from Washington county, became a member of the Council of State, and acquired an excellent reputation. In the year 1818 he decided to settle in Alabama, and President James Monroe, when informed of that fact, addressed the following communication to Governor Bibb, of Huntsville, Alabama, in regard to Colonel Campbell:

              "Louisville, June 24th, 1819

              "Dear Sir:

              "Had I seen you when at Huntsville I should have spoken to you and recommended to your kind attention Major John Campbell, lately of the Council of State in Virginia, now a resident of Alabama. I consider him a young man of great merit for integrity, strength and correctness of judgment and purity of political principles. In his welfare I take great interest. Well knowing his merit, I have thought it proper to communicate to communicate to you the sense I entertain of it, in the hope that it might be of some service to him.

              "With great respect and esteem, I am, dear sir, yours, etc.

              "/Signed/ James Monroe

              "Colonel Campbell did not long remain in Alabama, but returned to this county [Washington County, Virginia], and in April 1829, he was appointed Treasurer of the United States by President Jackson, and discharged the duties of that position until 1839, when, finding himself opposed to many of the policies of President Van Buren, he resigned his position, returned home, and ever afterwards advocated the policies of the Whig party."

              JOHN CAMPBELL IN ALABAMA

              The following excerpt is taken from a sketch of John Campbell contained in the "Dictionary of Alabama Biography," pages 292-293:

              "CAMPBELL, JOHN, secretary, first constitutional convention of Alabama, 1819, treasurer of the United States, ... He moved to Alabama in 1818, settled at Huntsville, and the following year was chosen secretary of the first constitutional convention of Alabam, 1819. About 1821 or 1822, he returned to Abingdon, and in April 1829 was appointed by President Andrew Jackson treasurer of the United States. He held that position until 1839, when, because of policy differences with President Van Buren, he resigned and returned to Abingdon, Va. At that time, he changed his allegiance from the Democratic party to the Whig party. He was the author of the sketches of Col. Arthur Campbell and Gen. William Campbell, which appear in Howe's "History of Virginia." He was never married. Last residence: Abingdon, Va."

              WILL OF JOHN CAMPBELL

              I have never found any documentary evidence which establishes the exact dates of birth or death of John Campbell. His will, dated 25 April 1865, was probated in Washington County VA on 25 February 1867. [See Washington County VA, Will Book 17, pagea 214-215.] In the will, John leaves his personal and real property to his brother Arthur for the duration of Arthur's natural life. After Arthur's death, the residue of John's property is to go to his nephew, Joseph T. [Trigg] Campbell. Joseph is named executor [Comment: Joseph Trigg Campbell was a son of John's brother, Edward Campbell].

              26 vii. Arthur Campbell, born Abt. 1791 in Washington County VA; died Abt. 1868 in Smyth County VA.

              + 27 viii. James Campbell, born 1794 in Washington County VA; died 20 August 1848 in Franklin County TN.

11. Arthur (Colonel Arthur)8 Campbell (David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 03 November 1743 in Augusta County VA, and died 08 August 1811 in Knox County KY. He married Margaret Campbell 10 May 1773 in VA Colony, daughter of Charles Campbell and Margaret Buchanan. She was born 1757 in Augusta County VA, and died 1813 in Knox County KY.

Children of Arthur Campbell and Margaret Campbell are:

              28 i. William9 Campbell. He married Sarah Adams.

              29 ii. John B. Campbell, died 1814. He married Polly Latham.

              30 iii. Charles Lewis Campbell. He married Sallie Morrison.

              31 iv. Arthur Lee Campbell. He married Sarah Thompson 07 November 1804 in Washington County VA.

              32 v. James Campbell, died 1815.

              33 vi. David H. Campbell. He married (1) Amelia Pepper. He married (2) Nancy Hand.

              34 vii. Elizabeth Campbell. She married John S. McFarland 02 February 1797 in Washington County VA.

              35 viii. Margaret Campbell. She married Isaac Sawyer.

              36 ix. Mary H. Campbell. She married William E. Beard 16 July 1807 in Washington County VA.

              37 x. Jane B. Campbell. She married Andrew Campbell.

              38 xi. Martha C. Campbell. She married Phili Berman.

              39 xii. Ann Augusta Campbell. She married William Owen.

12. Margaret8 Campbell (David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 31 March 1748 in Augusta County VA, and died 29 July 1799 in Knox County TN. She married David (Colonel David) Campbell 1774 in VA Colony, son of David Campbell and Jane Conyngham. He was born August 1753 in Augusta County VA, and died 24 November 1832 in Wilson County TN.

Notes for David (Colonel David) Campbell:

COLONEL DAVID CAMPBELL (1753-1832) OF CAMPBELL'S STATION

David was the youngest child of Black David Campbell having been born in August 1753 only a few months before the death of his father in November of the same year. Like his brother, he was raised by his uncles, William, Robert and Alexander. In 1774, he married Margaret Campbell, a daughter of White David Campbell, and settled on a small farm in the vicinity of the modern day town of Abingdon. In about 1782, David and Margaret removed to Washington County, North Carolina (now part of Tennessee). On 23 October 1782, David patented 153 acres of land on the east side of the "Mirey" branch of the Big Limestone, near land also patented by Charles Allison in 1782. David was then living in the same area as his brother William, and his uncles, Robert and Alexander.

Campbell's Station

In 1785, David and his wife moved to what was then Greene County, North Carolina, but is now Knox County, Tennessee. Together with three of David's cousins ("Elder David" Campbell, Alexander Campbell and "Big Jimmie" Campbell), they founded "Campbell's Station" located on Turkey Creek, a few miles southwest of the site of modern-day Knoxville. In 1787, David obtained a patent from the State of North Carolina, for 500 acres of land on Turkey Creek.

Military Service:

David served in Lord Dunmore's War (1774) and in the Revolutionary War. He served as a private at the Battle of Long Island Flats (July 1776) and at King's Mountain (October 1780). David was made a Captain of the Knox County Militia by Territorial Governor William Blount in 1792. After Tennessee became a state, Governor John Sevier appointed him a 2nd Major in the Tennessee Militia for Knox County ( 04 October 1796). He was appointed Lieutenant Colonel Commandant of the Knox County Militia on 20 December 1800.

Political Service:

David remained in Tennessee after his brother and uncles removed to Fayette County, Virginia (now Kentucky) in 1784. He participated in the government of the independent "State of Franklin" as a member of the Franklin Assembly. In 1787 he represented Greene County in the North Carolina General Assembly. After Tennessee was admitted to the Union, he was elected to the Tennessee State Legislature, representing Knox County in the forth and fifth General Assemblies (1801-1805).

Wives and Children:

David's wife Margaret died on 29 July 1799. In September 1803, he married, as his second wife, Jane Montgomery Cowan, widow of Samuel Cowan of Knox County. He and his second wife moved to Wilson County, Tennessee in the year 1823, where he acquired a 600 acre farm about seven miles from the City of Lebanon, Tennessee. Colonel Campbell died on 18 August 1832 and is buried in the village cemetery at Leeville, Tennessee. His second wife, Jane, died on 18 September 1840. Colonel Campbell had seven children by his first wife and three by his second. One of his daughters, Mary Hamilton Campbell, married Governor David Campbell (1779-1859) of Virginia: this David was a grandson of White David Campbell and served as Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 1837-1840.

Children of Margaret Campbell and David Campbell are:

              40 i. William9 Campbell.

              41 ii. Elizabeth Campbell.

              42 iii. Samuel Campbell.

              43 iv. Arthur Campbell.

              44 v. Jane Campbell. She married Colonel Charles Wright.

              45 vi. John Campbell, born 1777; died 1859 in AK. He married Emeline Cowen.

              + 46 vii. David Campbell, born 04 March 1781 in Washington County NC; died 18 June 1841 in Smith County TN.

              47 viii. Mary Hamilton Campbell, born 22 February 1783; died 06 October 1859 in Washington County VA. She married David (Governor David of VA) Campbell 1799 in Knox County TN; born 07 August 1779 in Washington County VA; died 19 March 1859 in Washington County VA.

              Notes for David (Governor David of VA) Campbell:

              The following sketch of Governor David Campbell is found at pages 766-767 of the book "History of Southwest Virginia" (published 1903), by Lewis Preston Summers:

              "DAVID CAMPBELL

              "The subject of this sketch was the eldest son of John Campbell and Elizabeth McDonald, his wife, of Hall's Bottom, Washington County, Virginia, and was born on the 2d of August, 1779, at Royal Oak (now in Smyth county), and was about eight years old when his father removed to Hall's Bottom. There he grew up, receiving such education as the frontier settlements could provide. In the year 1794, in his fifteenth year, he was appointed an Ensign in Captain John Davis's company of militia. In 1799 he was commissioned a captain of a company of light infantry assigned to the Seventieth Regiment of Militia, and in the fall of the same year he married his cousin, Mary Hamilton [Comment: Mary was the daughter of Colonel David Campbell of Campbell's Station, Tennessee]. He studied law, and was licensed, but never practiced his profession. In 1802 he was appointed deputy clerk of the County Court of Washington county, and chiefly discharged the duties of the office to the year 1812. On the 6th of July, 1812, he was commissioned a major in the Twelfth Regiment of Infantry, United States army, and marched with the forces to the lakes of Canada, where he served under Generals Alexander Smyth and Van Rensselaer. On the 12th of March, 1813, he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the Thirtieth Regiment, where he served until the year 1814, when he resigned his commission. Upon his return home he entered the service of Virginia as aide-de-camp to Governor Barbour, and gave valuable assistance to organizing the large military forces called into service in the summer of 1814. In the year 1815 he was elected by the General Assembly as general of the Third Brigade of the Virginia Militia. On the 25th of January, 1815 he was appointed colonel of the Third Virginia Cavalry, and was afterward transferred to the Fifth Regiment of Cavalry. Upon his return to Abingdon, he entered the clerk's office, where he remained until 1820, when he was elected a member of the State Senate from the Abingdon district for the term of four years. In 1824 he was elected clerk of the County Court of Washington county, which position he occupied until he took his seat as Governor of Virginia, on the 31st of March, 1837. Governor Campbell, at the time of his election, was a Jacksonian Democrat, but while Governor, and during the administration of President Van Buren, the sub-treasury scheme and the standing army bill, as they were commonly called, were made party measures, and being opposed to them, he warmly supported General Harrison in the presidential campaign of 1840, and ever after acted with the Whig party. Governor Campbell, in his first message to the General Assembly, proposed the establishment of the common school system, of which he was one of the earliest advocates. Upon his retirement from the position of Governor of the Commonwealth, he was commissioned a justice of the peace for Washington county, and was diligent in the discharge of his duties as such until the year 1852, when he returned to private life, after having spent nearly one-half a century in the public service. In person Governor Campbell was about five feet eleven inches in height, spare and erect in carriage, with dark hair and eyes and intellectual countenance and pleasing manners. He died at "Mont Calm," his home, now the home of Colonel Cummings, on March 19th, 1859, without issue, and his remains were interred in Sinking Spring Cemetery, Abingdon, Virginia."

              WILL OF GOVERNOR DAVID CAMPBELL

              David Campbell's will, dated 4 February 1857, with codicil dated 7 September 1857, was probated in Washington County VA on 29 March 1859. [See Washington County VA, Will Book 14, pages 402-407.]

13. David (Judge David)8 Campbell (David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 1750 in Augusta County VA, and died 21 November 1812 in Rhea County TN. He married Elizabeth Outlaw 1779 in VA, daughter of Colonel Outlaw and Penelope Smith. She was born 1765 in Duplin County NC, and died January 1821 in Dallas County AL.

Notes for David (Judge David) Campbell:

I have not personally researched the genealogy of Judge David Campbell, son of White David. The information concerning his family has been obtained from a book by Rev. Silas E. Lucas entitled "Leaves from the Family Tree," published in 1982.

Although Judge Campbell had a distinguished professional career, he also enjoys the somewhat dubious distinction of being the first public official to be impeached in the history of the State of Tennessee! Judge Campbell was impeached in December 1798 on a complaint from William Blount to Governor John Sevier concerning a judicial ruling of Campbell in a lawsuit. Judge Campbell was tried before the TN Senate and, on 26 December 1798, Judge Campbell was acquitted by a single vote (two-thirds majority required to sustain the impeachment). Ironically, William Blount, Campbell's accuser, was the presiding officer of the Senate and he had to officially declare Judge Campbell "not guilty!" [See TN Historical Quarterly, Volume XVI, Mar-Dec 1957, pages 292-296.]

Children of David Campbell and Elizabeth Outlaw are:

              48 i. Penelope Smith9 Campbell, born 1784.

              49 ii. Mary H. Campbell, born 1786.

              50 iii. Elizabeth O. Campbell, born 1788.

              51 iv. Alexander Outlaw Campbell, born 1791.

              52 v. Thomas Jefferson Campbell, born 1793 in TN; died 13 April 1850 in TN.

              53 vi. Dolly A. Campbell, born 1795.

              54 vii. Margaret P. Campbell, born 1796.

              55 viii. Harriet A. Campbell, born 1798.

              56 ix. Letitia V. Campbell, born 1801.

              57 x. Caroline A. Campbell, born 1803.

              58 xi. Victor Moreau Campbell, born 1807.

14. Robert8 Campbell (David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born May 1755 in Augusta County VA, and died 25 December 1831. He married Rebecca McDonald 1783, daughter of Edward McDonald and Elizabeth Robinson. She was born Abt. 1755.

Children of Robert Campbell and Rebecca McDonald are:

              59 i. Mary9 Campbell.

              60 ii. David Campbell.

              61 iii. Elizabeth Campbell.

              62 iv. Martha Campbell.

              63 v. Edward Campbell.

              64 vi. Robert Campbell.

16. Charles8 Campbell (Patrick7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) died 1767. He married Margaret Buchanan.

Children of Charles Campbell and Margaret Buchanan are:

              + 65 i. William (General William)9 Campbell, born 1745 in Augusta County VA; died 22 August 1781 in Williamsburg VA.

              + 66 ii. Margaret Campbell, born 1757 in Augusta County VA; died 1813 in Knox County KY.

              67 iii. John Campbell.

              68 iv. Elizabeth Campbell. She married John Taylor.

              69 v. Jane Campbell. She married Thomas Tate.

              70 vi. Anne Campbell. She married Richard Poston.

19. Patrick8 Campbell (Patrick7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) died 1799 in Muhlenberg County KY. He married Anne Steel.

Children of Patrick Campbell and Anne Steel are:

              + 71 i. William (Colonel William)9 Campbell, born 1759 in VA Colony; died 19 November 1800 in Lafayette County KY.

              72 ii. Robert Campbell.

              73 iii. Samuel Campbell.

              74 iv. Jane Campbell. She married Robert Love.

Generation No. 4

21. Edward9 Campbell (John8, David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 1781 in Washington County VA, and died 1833 in Washington County VA. He married Rhoda Trigg. She was born 1797 in VA, and died 1864 in Washington County VA.

Children of Edward Campbell and Rhoda Trigg are:

              75 i. Mary J.10 Campbell. She married Connally F. Trigg 23 May 1833 in Washington County VA; born 08 March 1810 in Washington County VA; died 25 April 1880 in Washington County VA.

              76 ii. Elizabeth M. Campbell, born 23 May 1815 in Washington County VA; died 28 December 1842 in Washington County VA. She married Charles C. Gibson 01 September 1836; born 23 June 1805; died 02 June 1844 in Washington County VA.

              77 iii. Francis S. Campbell, born 1818 in Washington County VA; died 06 May 1852 in Washington County VA. He married Anne Elizabeth Hickman; born 13 November 1827; died 29 July 1891 in Washington County VA.

              78 iv. Anne Campbell, born 20 November 1820 in Washington County VA; died 27 May 1844 in Washington County VA. She married James K. Gibson 25 November 1841 in Washington County VA; died 30 March 1879 in Washington County VA.

              79 v. John A. (Judge) Campbell, born 1823 in Washington County VA; died 17 June 1886 in Washington County VA. He married Mary Branche; born 1827; died 1908 in Washington County VA.

              80 vi. Edward McDonald (Doctor) Campbell, born 31 October 1825 in Wasington County VA; died 12 June 1878 in Warm Springs GA. He married Ellen Sheffey; born 26 May 1836; died 13 July 1912 in Washington County VA.

              + 81 vii. Joseph Trigg Campbell, born 28 November 1827 in Washington County VA; died 16 April 1876 in Washington County VA.

              82 viii. James C. (Major) Campbell, born 1830; died 1896. He married Ellen A. Kernan 1853.

22. Mary9 Campbell (John8, David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 1783 in VA Colony, and died 15 October 1829 in Washington County VA. She married James Cummings 30 September 1802 in Washington County VA, son of Reverand Cummings and Mildred Carter. He was born 1773 in VA Colony, and died 01 August 1840 in Washington County VA.

Children of Mary Campbell and James Cummings are:

              83 i. James C.10 Cummings.

              84 ii. Eliza A. M. Cummings.

              85 iii. Charles J. Cummings, born 28 September 1810 in Washington County VA; died 05 July 1891 in Washington County VA. He married Eliza Gibson; born 22 March 1831 in Washington County VA; died 19 March 1879 in Washington County VA.

              86 iv. David C. Cummings.

              87 v. Arthur C. Cummings, born 01 October 1822 in Washington County VA; died 19 March 1905 in Washington County VA. He married Elizabeth Preston; born 1824; died 09 March 1896 in Washington County VA.

              88 vi. Robert E. Cummings, born 28 March 1816 in Washington County VA; died 15 December 1890 in Washington County VA.

              89 vii. Amelia Carter Cummings, born 16 July 1804 in Washington County VA; died 06 January 1881 in Washington County VA.

27. James9 Campbell (John8, David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 1794 in Washington County VA, and died 20 August 1848 in Franklin County TN. He married Musidora Anderson 1822, daughter of W. Anderson and _____ Bell.

Notes for James Campbell:

The following is an excerpt from the "Biographical Directory of the Tennessee General Assembly" (published 1975), Volume I, 1796-1861, pages 115-116:

"Campbell, James (c.1793-1848)

"HOUSE, 17th General Assembly, 1827-29, representing Franklin County; SENATE, 18th General Assembly, 1841-43; representing Franklin and Warren Counties; HOUSE, 24th General Assembly, 1841-43; representing Davidson County; listed as a Whig in latter sessions, party lines not drawn in earlier ones. ... Mr. Campbell was 'educated in Washington County, Virginia;' studied law. Was married, date and place not stated, to Musedere Anderson of Nashville, Davidson County, daughter of W. P. Anderson and wife who had been Miss Bell; ... subject's obituary reads, 'He left an interesting family of children to lament his loss.' Came as a young man to Franklin County and began practice of law in 1817; continued until 1835, when he moved to Nashville to become a leader at the bar; retired in 1845 because of failing health. Died at Winchester Springs, Franklin County, August 20, 1848; buried in Old City Cemetary, Nashville."

Children of James Campbell and Musidora Anderson are:

              + 90 i. Nancy10 Campbell.

              + 91 ii. Elizabeth M. Campbell.

              92 iii. William Patton Anderson Campbell, died 1868 in Tennessee.

              93 iv. Caroline Campbell. She married William Trabue 21 September 1842 in Davidson County TN.

46. David9 Campbell (Margaret8, David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 04 March 1781 in Washington County NC, and died 18 June 1841 in Smith County TN. He married Catherine Bowen 15 April 1806 in Sumner County TN, daughter of William Bowen and Mary Russell. She was born 17 March 1785, and died 19 March 1868 in Camp Bell TN.

Children of David Campbell and Catherine Bowen are:

              94 i. Mary H. R.10 Campbell. She married E. P. Scales.

              + 95 ii. William (Governor William of TN) Bowen Campbell, born 01 February 1807 in Sumner County TN; died 19 August 1867 in Lebanon (Camp Bell), Wilson County TN.

              96 iii. John (Dr. John) Hamilton Campbell, born 21 June 1808; died 16 February 1890.

              97 iv. Margaret Hamilton Campbell, born 29 August 1812; died 09 May 1880.

              98 v. Virginia Tabitha Jane Campbell, born 1818; died 1867. She married William Shelton.

              + 99 vi. David H. R. Campbell, born 29 June 1826 in Smith County TN; died 21 September 1872 in Wilson County TN.

65. William (General William)9 Campbell (Charles8, Patrick7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 1745 in Augusta County VA, and died 22 August 1781 in Williamsburg VA. He married Elizabeth Henry 02 April 1776 in Williamsburg VA, daughter of John Henry and Sarah Winston. She was born 10 July 1749 in Hanover County VA, and died 18 March 1825 in Washington County VA.

Notes for William (General William) Campbell:

WILLIAM CAMPBELL AND THE BATTLE OF KINGS MOUNTAIN

It is beyond the scope of this narrative to discuss the Battle of Kings Mountain in any great detail. The noted military historian, Henry Lumpkin, gives a very good and objective account of the battle in his book From Savannah to Yorktown, at pages 91-104. The official report of the engagement, signed by Colonels Campbell, Shelby and Cleveland, was published in the Virginia Gazette on 18 November 1780 and was included in Lyman C. Draper's book Kings Mountain and Its Heroes, at pages 522-524. Prior to issuance of this official report, a shorter account had already been made in a letter written by the American commander, Colonel William Campbell, a few days after the battle. A transcript of Colonel Campbell's letter is as follows:

"October 25th, 1780

"Dear Sir,

"Ferguson and his party are no more in circumstances to require the citizens of America. We came up with him in Craven County, South Carolina posted on a height called Kings Mountain, about 12 miles north of the Cherokee ford of broad River, about two o'clock in the evening of the seventh instant, we having marched the whole night before. Col. Shelby's regiment and mine began the attack, & sustained the whole fire of the enemy for about ten minutes while the other troops were forming around the height, upon which the enemy was posted. The firing then became general, & as heavy as you can conceive for the number of men. The advantageous situation of the enemy, being on the top of a steep ridge, obliged us to expose ourselves exceedingly, and the dislodging of them was equal to driving men from strong breastworks; though in the end we gained the point of the ridge where my regiment fought, and drove them along the summit of it nearly to the other end, where Col. Cleveland and his country men were. Then they were drove into a huddle, and the greatest confusion; the flag for a surrender was immediately hoisted, and as soon as our troops could be notified of it, the firing ceased, and the survivors surrendered. The estimated prisoners at discretion. The victory was complete to a wish. My regiment has suffered more than any other in the action. I must proceed with the prisoners until I can in some way dispose of them, probably I may go on to Richmond in Virginia.

"I am etc.

"/S/ Wm Campbell, Col. Cdr."

WILLIAM CAMPBELL'S PROMOTION, ILLNESS AND DEATH

Largely as the result of the Kings Mountain victory, Colonel William Campbell was made a Brigadier General by the Virginia Legislature in December 1780. Campbell was subsequently appointed to the Marquis de LaFayette's staff and was present at the beginning of the siege of Cornwallis's forces at Yorktown. Unfortunately, while at Yorktown, Campbell became ill with what was then called "camp fever" and died on 22 August 1781.

SHELBY-CAMPBELL CONTOVERSY

Colonel Isaac Shelby had commanded the militia regiment from Sullivan County, North Carolina during the Battle of Kings Mountain, serving under the overall command of William Campbell. In July 1822, two private letters written by Isaac Shelby to Colonel John Sevier in 1810 were published by Sevier's son, Colonel G. W. Sevier. In these letters, Shelby strongly implied that Colonel Campbell had displayed a less than appropriate degree of courage during the fighting. The publication of these letters generated a firestorm of criticism of Colonel Shelby for this apparent attempt to damage the reputation of a long dead hero who was no longer able to defend himself. The Campbells were, of course, incensed by Shelby's remarks and immediately rallied to the defense of their kinsman. John Campbell of Richmond, a grandson of White David, even sent a letter to Thomas Jefferson, who at the time of the battle had been the Governor of Virginia, requesting his recollection of the battle and Campbell's role in the American victory. Jefferson's response is presented below.

In April 1823, Shelby issued a pamphlet that further detailed his criticisms of William Campbell. In reply, the supporters of General Campbell obtained a number of letters from participants in the battle that refuted Shelby's accusations. One of these letters was from Colonel David Campbell (1753-1832) of Campbells Station and is presented below. The complete account of the Shelby-Campbell affair is contained in Lyman Draper's book King's Mountain and Its Heroes, at pages 558-590.

THOMAS JEFFERSON'S LETTER

The following letter of Thomas Jefferson to John Campbell of Richmond, Virginia concerns the Battle of Kings Mountain (fought on 7 October 1780) and the conduct of the American battlefield commander, Colonel William Campbell (1745-1781) of Washington County, Virginia. The letter was in response to an inquiry from John Campbell (1789-c. 1864), younger brother of Governor David Campbell of Virginia, who would, in 1829, become Treasurer of the United States under Andrew Jackson. John Campbell had written Jefferson as a result of disparaging comments made by Isaac Shelby, the former Governor of Kentucky, concerning the conduct of Colonel Campbell during the battle. The transcript of Jefferson's letter, taken from the Campbell Papers (from microfilm reel no.1, available at the Tennessee State Library) is as follows:

To: John Campbell, Esq.

Richmond

Monticello, Nov. 10, 1822

"Sir,

"I have to acknowledge your favor of the 4th instant which gives me the first information I have ever received that the laurels which Col. Campbell so honorably won in the battle of Kings Mountain had ever been brought into question by anyone. To him has ever been ascribed so much of the success of that brilliant action as the valor and conduct of an able commander might justly claim. This lessens nothing the merits of his companions in arms, officers and soldiers, who all and every one acted well their parts in their respective stations. I have no papers on this subject in my possession - all such received at that day having belonged to the records of the Council; but I remember well the deep and grateful impression made on the minds of every one by that memorable victory. It was the joyful annunciation of that turn of the tide of success which terminated the Revolutionary War, with the seal of our independence. The slighting expression complained of as hazarded by the venerable Shelby might seem inexcusable in a younger man, but he was then old and I can assure you dear Sir, from mortifying experience that the lapses of memory of an old man are innocent subjects of compassion more than of blame. The descendants of Col. Campbell may rest their heads well on the pillow of his renown. History has consecrated and will forever preserve us in the faithful annals of a grateful country. With the expressions of the high sense I entertain of his character, accept the assurance to yourself of my great esteem and respect.

"/S/ Thos. Jefferson

"P. S. I received at the same time with your letter one from William G. Preston on the same subject. Writing is so slow and painful to one that I must pray you to make for me my acknowledgement to him and my request that he will consider this as an answer to his as well your favor."

COLONEL DAVID CAMPBELL'S LETTER

During the Shelby - Campbell controversy, discussed above, the views of Colonel David Campbell (1753-1832) of Campbells Station were sought. Colonel David Campbell had participated in the Battle of Kings Mountain as a private in the Washington County, Virginia militia. David Campbell's statement concerning the conduct of the commanding officer of the American forces, Colonel William Campbell (1745-1781), was subsequently included by Lyman C. Draper in his book Kings Mountain and Its Heroes (published 1881), on page 587, as follows:

"I saw Col. William Campbell on horseback at the time the battle commenced, riding along the lines, encouraging the men. When driven down the mountain, Major Edmondson endeavored to rally the men; but did not succeed, until Col. Campbell came along the lines, calling the men to "halt, and return, my brave fellows, and you will drive the enemy immediately;" and, it appeared, as soon as they heard his voice they halted, returned, renewed the attack, and drove the enemy along the mountain, from behind rocks, and their wagons, until Feruson was slain, and they surrendered. I saw Col. Campbell there, on foot, engaged in securing the prisoners. About this time, I observed Capt. DePeyster inquire for the commanding officer. Col. Campbell, who was but a little distance from him, was pointed out to him; he stepped forward, and delivered his sword. I was not more than twenty feet from DePeyster."

Children of William Campbell and Elizabeth Henry are:

              + 100 i. Sarah Buchanan10 Campbell, born 21 April 1778 in Washington County VA.

              101 ii. Charles Henry Campbell, born 1780 in Washington County VA; died 1785 in Washington County VA.

66. Margaret9 Campbell (Charles8, Patrick7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 1757 in Augusta County VA, and died 1813 in Knox County KY. She married Arthur (Colonel Arthur) Campbell 10 May 1773 in VA Colony, son of David Campbell and Mary Hamilton. He was born 03 November 1743 in Augusta County VA, and died 08 August 1811 in Knox County KY.

Children are listed above under (11) Arthur (Colonel Arthur) Campbell.

71. William (Colonel William)9 Campbell (Patrick8, Patrick7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 1759 in VA Colony, and died 19 November 1800 in Lafayette County KY. He married Tabitha Adams Russell Abt. January 1784 in Washington County VA, daughter of General Russell and Tabitha Adams. She was born 1764 in Culpepper County VA, and died 26 July 1806 in Muhlenberg County KY.

Notes for William (Colonel William) Campbell:

WILL OF COLONEL WILLIAM CAMPBELL OF MUHLENBERG COUNTY KY

The following will of William Campbell, dated 17 November 1800, was probated in Muhlenberg County KY during the February term of Court, 1801 [Muhlenberg County KY, Will Book 1, page 9].

"In the name of God - Amen.

"I William Campbell of Muhlenberg County, being weak in body but of sound mind and memory and understanding, doth make public and declare this my last will and testement in manner and form following, to wit:

"I will and bequeath unto my well beloved wife Tabitha Campbell during her natural life and for her support and the support of my children until such time as my said children should think to searate from my said wife, the following property, to wit: five hundred acres of land to be laid off in good form by my executers to be named so as to include the plantation w3here I now live with free use of all the sugar trees, that is on my land, that lies on the creek from the said platation, also the following slaves to wit:

"Peter and his wife Letty

"Ailsa and her two sons, Isaac and Jacob

"Also I give and bequeath unto my son Samuel Campbell the five hundred acres of land as above bequeathed to my said wife. But if it should be the wish of my said son Samuel to settle himself before the death of my said wife, it is my will and desire that there be two hundred acres of uncultivated land laid off for him by my executers out of the five hundred acres above bequeathed to my wife, the said five hundred acres of land to my said son and his heirs and assignees forever. Also I give and bequeath unto my said son one Negro boy by the name of Cornelius, to him and his assigees forever.

"I give and bequeath unto my five daughters to wit:

"Elizabeth, Tabitha, Ann, Polly and Jennie all the land in Muhlenberg county except the five hundred acres as above bequeathed to be equally divided among them by my executers - to them their heirs and assignees forever. I also give to each of my said daughters one Negro - to wit:

"To my daughter Elizabeth one Negro girl named Viney;

"to my daughter Tabitha one Negro boy named Richard;

"to my daughter Ann one Negro girl named Cecelia;

"to my daughter Polly one Negro girl nemed Becky;

"to my daughter Jennie one Negro girl named Chloe

"- the said Negros to my said children their heirs and assignees forever.

"It is my desire that my executers make a deed to William Bradford for one hundred and fifty acres of land, lying in the State of Tennessee - it being a part of my part of a survey in the name of Robert S. Russell.

"It is also my desire and will that my proposals to the Court of Muhlenberg County be complied with.

"It is my will and desire that all my land lying in the State of Tenn. except the one hundred and fifty acres above mentioned, with all the lands I own in Logan County be sold by my executers when and how my executers may think proper, and the money arising from it be applied for the further support and convenience of my wife and children, in such manner as my executers shall or may think proper.

"It is my will and desire that all the remaining part of my estate whether real or personal be divided by my executers equally among my children, to them and their heirs forever, rembering at the same time that all my just debts be paid.

"It is my will and desire that my horse mill that I have been about erecting near Greenville in Muhlenberg County be completed and the necessary money for the purpose of completing is owing me, to be collected and paid by my executers.

"Although I have given to my wife and children the following Negros or slaves to wit: Isaac, Cornelius, Viney, Jacob, Richard, and Celia, Becky, and Chloe, yet it is my will and desire that the said Negroes from and after they arrive at the age of thirty years shall enjoy their full and perfect freedom, in as full and perfect manner as if they had been born free.

"I do hereby nominate and appoint my dearly belovd wife Tabitha Campbell and my friends William Russell and Robert Wilson executers of this my last will and testement, revoking all former wills heretofore made by me.

"In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 17th day of November 1800.

"William Campbell (Seal)

"Signed sealed and declared by the above named William Campbell to be his last will and testement in the presence of us, who have hereto subscribed our names as witnesses in the presence of the Testator and in the presence of each other.

"James Blythe

"Benjamin Porter"

Children of William Campbell and Tabitha Russell are:

              + 102 i. Eliza10 Campbell, born November 1784; died 30 May 1810 in Muhlenberg County KY.

              103 ii. Tabitha A. R. Campbell, born 29 January 1785; died 17 February 1850 in Muhlenberg County KY. She married Judge Alney McLean 16 November 1805; born 10 June 1779 in North Carolina; died 31 December 1841 in Muhlenberg County KY.

              104 iii. Ann (Nancy) Steel Campbell, born 13 March 1788; died 17 January 1863 in Muhlenberg County KY. She married Charles Fox Wing 10 December 1806 in Muhlenberg County KY; born 15 January 1780 in Massachusetts; died 25 September 1861 in Muhlenberg County KY.

              + 105 iv. Dr. Samuel R. Campbell, born Abt. 1789; died 28 July 1821 in Gallatin County IL.

              106 v. Mary B. Campbell, born 25 March 1791; died 04 December 1850 in Muhlenberg County KY. She married Ephraim Brank 1817 in Muhlenberg County KY; born 01 August 1791 in North Carolina; died 1874.

              107 vi. Jane L. Campbell, born 1793; died 15 May 1814.

Generation No. 5

81. Joseph Trigg10 Campbell (Edward9, John8, David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 28 November 1827 in Washington County VA, and died 16 April 1876 in Washington County VA. He married Mary Preston. She was born 18 September 1833 in Washington County VA, and died 22 June 1914 in Washington County VA.

Children of Joseph Campbell and Mary Preston are:

              108 i. Joseph Garnett11 Campbell.

              109 ii. Mary Campbell.

              110 iii. Robert H. Campbell.

              111 iv. Elizabeth Campbell.

               

90. Nancy10 Campbell (James9, John8, David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) She married William Downing 13 October 1842 in Davidson County TN.

Child of Nancy Campbell and William Downing is:

              112 i. Jesse11 Downing.

               

91. Elizabeth M.10 Campbell (James9, John8, David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) She married James A. Woods 28 March 1843 in Davidson County TN.

Children of Elizabeth Campbell and James Woods are:

              113 i. James11 Woods.

              114 ii. Julia Woods.

95. William (Governor William of TN) Bowen10 Campbell (David9, Margaret8, David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 01 February 1807 in Sumner County TN, and died 19 August 1867 in Lebanon (Camp Bell), Wilson County TN. He married Frances Isabella Owen 10 September 1835 in Carthage TN, daughter of John Owen and Mary Goodwin. She was born 05 February 1818 in Carthage TN, and died 22 March 1864 in Lebanon (Camp Bell), Wilson County TN.

Notes for William (Governor William of TN) Bowen Campbell:

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF WILLIAM BOWEN CAMPBELL

William Bowen Campbell was the grandson of Colonel David Campbell (1753-1832) of Campbell's Station and the nephew of Governor David Campbell (1779-1859) of Virginia. Governor David Campbell supervised William's education and sent him to the famous law school operated by Henry St. George Tucker at Winchester, Virginia. Subsequently, in 1830, Governor David Campbell furnished William with funds to establish a law practice in Carthage, Tennessee.

In 1835, William Bowen Campbell married Frances Isabella Owen by whom he had ten children; one of whom was Margaret Hamilton Campbell who, in 1911, published the book entitled "Historical Sketches of the Campbell, Pilcher and Kindred Families." For several years, the William Bowen Campbell family lived in Carthage with the Owen family, but in 1842, they moved into their own home, also in Carthage. In 1853, they moved to a small farm on the edge of Lebanon, Tennessee, that he renamed Camp Bell.

Besides pursuing the practice of law, William Bowen Campbell was involved in both political and military activities as follows:

1831-34 Attorney General for the Sparta TN area

1835-36 Member of the TN State Legislature

1836-37 Captain in TN Militia during Creek and Seminole War in Florida

1837-43 U. S. Congressman from TN (Whig)

1844-45 Major General of the TN State Militia

1846-47 Colonel of the 1st TN Regiment of Volunteers in the Mexican War (the "Bloody First," which displayed conspicuous bravery during the Battle of Monterey)

1847-48 Circuit Judge for TN

1851-53 Governor of TN (Whig)

1863 Brigadier General of the Union Army (Civil War)

1865-66 U. S. Congressman from TN

In 1853, though he had been a very popular Whig Governor and could have easily won reelection, William Campbell declined to run for a second term. Accordingly, the Democrat Andrew Johnson won the election to succeed Campbell as Governor. Without this electoral success, Johnson would probably never have been selected as a running mate with Abraham Lincoln in the 1864 election.

Throughout the Civil War, William Bowen Campbell supported the Union. He had been a political opponent of Andrew Johnson in TN; however, after the Civil War, while in Congress, Governor Campbell became one of President Johnson's staunchest supporters.

In the election of 1864, Governor Campbell was seriously considered as a vice-presidential candidate on the Democrat ticket with General George B. McClellan, but was unsuccessful due to the opposition of Emerson Etheridge.

I close this sketch with the words of Tennessee historian, Philip M. Hamer. In his book "Tennessee - A History," Mr. Hamer said that William Bowen Campbell:

" was a man in whose integrity and honesty and mental and moral courage even his political enemies had confidence. He was one of those few men in public life who did not seek office but had it thrust upon them."

Children of William Campbell and Frances Owen are:

              115 i. Frances (Fanny) A.11 Campbell.

              116 ii. Lemuel Russell Campbell.

              117 iii. Mary Owen Campbell. She married D. C. Kelley January 1869.

              118 iv. Margaret Hamilton Campbell, born 07 December 1843 in Tennessee; died 26 September 1921 in Wilson County TN. She married James Stuart Pilcher; born 28 October 1840; died 23 July 1934 in Wilson County TN.

              119 v. William Bowen Campbell, born 21 July 1846; died 29 May 1869 in Wilson County TN.

              120 vi. Joseph Allen Campbell, born 13 July 1853; died 26 September 1939 in Wilson County TN.

              121 vii. John (Dr. John) Owen Campbell, born 27 April 1856; died 05 December 1941 in Wilson County TN. He married Susie Towson; born 10 November 1860; died 26 December 1929 in Wilson County TN.

99. David H. R.10 Campbell (David9, Margaret8, David (White David)7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 29 June 1826 in Smith County TN, and died 21 September 1872 in Wilson County TN. He married Lucy G. Goodall 29 June 1852.

Child of David Campbell and Lucy Goodall is:

              122 i. John Owen11 Campbell, born January 1859 in Smith County TN; died 28 March 1926 in Davidson County TN. He married Kate Spiller Findlay 13 February 1881 in White County TN.

               

100. Sarah Buchanan10 Campbell (William (General William)9, Charles8, Patrick7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born 21 April 1778 in Washington County VA. She married Colonel Francis Preston 10 January 1793 in Montgomery County VA.

Children of Sarah Campbell and Colonel Preston are:

              123 i. Sarah B.11 Preston. She married Governor John Floyd; born in VA.

              124 ii. Susan Preston. She married Governor McDowell; born in VA.

102. Eliza10 Campbell (William (Colonel William)9, Patrick8, Patrick7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born November 1784, and died 30 May 1810 in Muhlenberg County KY. She married Barton W. Stone 02 July 1801. He was born 24 December 1772 in Maryland, and died 09 November 1844 in Hannibal MO.

Children of Eliza Campbell and Barton Stone are:

              125 i. Amanda11 Stone. She married Samuel Adams Bowen 1821 in Sumner County TN; born 1790; died 02 November 1854 in Hannibal MO.

              126 ii. Tabitha Stone. She married James Shackelford.

              127 iii. Mary A. Stone. She married C. C. Moore.

105. Dr. Samuel R.10 Campbell (William (Colonel William)9, Patrick8, Patrick7, John6, Duncan5, Andrew4, Hugh3, Patrick2, Duncan1) was born Abt. 1789, and died 28 July 1821 in Gallatin County IL. He married Cynthia Ann Campbell Abt. 1815, daughter of William Campbell and Anne Campbell. She was born Abt. 1797 in Fayette County KY, and died Aft. 1883 in Concrete TX.

Child of Dr. Campbell and Cynthia Campbell is:

              128 i. William11 Campbell, born January 1821 in Gallatin County IL; died 29 June 1821 in Gallatin County IL.